Sorry, you can't have fries with that: Here are 10 foods that may disappear … – Raw Story

Climate change is making the world a different place. There are more floods, droughts, wildfires, heat waves and other extreme weather events. Animal species around the world are either shifting habitat locations or simply dying off. Even humans are migrating due to a warmer world.

But there is one effect that will hit many of us right in the gut: Certain foods could disappear thanks to our changing climate. Brace yourself: here are 10 foods you’ll probably be sad to see go.

(image: Foodio/Shutterstock)

1. Guacamole

Around 8 million pounds of guacamole are consumed during the Super Bowl, but football fans might soon have to find something else to dip their tortilla chips into. Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory predict as much as a 40 percent decrease in avocado production over the next 30 years due to increasing temperatures brought on by climate change.

As a result, the fast food chain Chipotle, which goes through 97,000 pounds of avocados a day — 35 million pounds every year — has warned that if climate change worsens, it may be forced to stop serving guacamole. The company says it “may choose to temporarily suspend serving menu items, such as guacamole or one or more of our salsas, rather than paying the increased cost for the ingredients.”

(image: Africa Studio/Shutterstock)

2. Apples

“Even if I knew that tomorrow the world would go to pieces,” the German theologian Martin Luther said, “I would still plant my apple tree.” He didn’t figure that there might be a tomorrow in which apple trees can’t properly grow. In 2011, an international team of scientists published a study which found just that: Temperate fruit and nut trees like the apple tree, which need a certain period of winter chill to produce economically practical yields, could be affected by global warming as winter temperatures rise. They said farmers should prepare for a warmer future by breeding cultivars with lower chilling requirements.

Such apples will likely taste different from the ones we have today, according to a Japanese study which found that rising temperatures are causing apple trees to bear fruit sooner, making them softer and sweeter. “If you could eat an average apple harvested 30 years before and an average apple harvested recently at the same time, you would really taste the difference,” said Toshihiko Sugiura of the National Agriculture and Food Research Organization in Tsukuba, Japan, the study’s lead author.

(image: Brent Hofacker/Shutterstock)

3. Beer

It’s sad, but true. Beer is already a victim of a changing climate, with brewers increasingly finding it more difficult to secure stable water supplies. According to a 2010 report commissioned by the National Resources Defense Council, about a third of counties in the United States “will face higher risks of water shortages by mid-century as the result of global warming.” Between 2030 and 2050, the difficulty in accessing freshwater is “anticipated to be significant in the major agricultural and urban areas throughout the nation.”

Some specialty hops used by craft brewers have already become harder to source, since warming winters are producing earlier and smaller yields. “This is not a problem that’s going to happen someday,” said Jenn Orgolini of Colorado’s New Belgium Brewery. “If you drink beer now, the issue of climate change is impacting you right now.” She said that in 2011, the hops her brewery normally uses weren’t available due to Pacific Northwest weather conditions.

(image: Mi.Ti./Shutterstock)

4. Rice and Beans

The late comedian/philosopher Bill Hicks once said, “The American dream is a crock. Stop wanting everything. Everyone should wear jeans and have three T-shirts, eat rice and beans.” He didn’t live long enough to find out that climate change could threaten the ability to follow his wise suggestion. It’s hard to overstate the importance of rice to world. It is a food staple for almost half of the world’s population. But climate change could significantly impact rice yields in this century.

According to a 2005 report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, “temperature increases, rising seas and changes in rainfall patterns and distribution expected as a result of global climate change could lead to substantial modifications in land and water resources for rice production as well as in the productivity of rice crops grown in different parts of the world.” A 2005 report by the United States Department of Agriculture found that the viability of rice-growing land in tropical areas could decline by more than 50 percent during the next century.

Beans feed the majority of the human population in Latin America and much of Africa and are a part of the daily diet of more than 400 million people across the developing world. But beans may also experience declines due to a warming world. According to a report the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), higher temperatures could reduce bean yields by as much as 25 percent. “Beans are highly sensitive to heat, and the varieties that farmers currently grow do not yield well under night temperatures over 18 or 19 degrees Centigrade,” writes Nathan Russell of CIAT. “Higher temperatures drastically reduce seed fertility, leading to lower grain yields and quality.” Thankfully, CIAT scientists have identified about 30 “elite” bean lines that have demonstrated tolerance to temperatures 4°C higher than the crop’s normal “comfort zone.”

(image: Kayo/Shutterstock)

5. Seafood

One of the most dramatic effects of climate change is ocean acidification, a decrease in the pH, or the hydrogen ion concentration, of the Earth’s oceans, making the water more acidic. This is caused by the ocean absorbing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere — carbon we are spewing by burning fossil fuel and mowing down forests. This decrease in pH makes it harder for organisms like corals, crustaceans like lobsters, crabs and shrimp, and molluscs like clams, oysters, snails, mussels and scallops to form the calcium-based shells and exoskeletons they need to survive. Scientists at the Ocean Acidification Research Center of the University of Alaska Fairbanks have warned that shellfish farmers off the Alaska coast may need to start modifying the sea water in their hatcheries as they expect “significant effects” from acidification by 2040.

Scientists also believe that pink salmon, the most abundant of the Pacific salmon species, will be one of the primary victims of climate change, since the fish cannot survive the increasingly acidic waters. In a recent study, scientists at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and MacEwan University in Edmonton reared pink salmon in the lab under water acidity levels expected at the end of this century. They found that when the fish reached the age at which they would migrate to the sea, their ability to use oxygen in their muscles was significantly decreased. This means their future wild brethren will face difficulties locating food and evading predators.

Ocean acidification isn’t the only climate-related threat to fish. According to a study conducted by a team of Australian scientists, higher temperatures will increase the toxicity of common pesticides and industrial contaminants such as endosulfan, an insecticide, and phenol, an organic compound used to produce plastics and a variety of pharmaceuticals, which threatens the survival of a wide array of freshwater species such as trout, perch and carp.

(image: avs/Shutterstock.com)

6. Chocolate

“Everywhere in the world there are tensions — economic, political, religious,” said French chef Alain Ducasse in a 2013 interview with the Wall Street Journal. “So we need chocolate.” Who among us can disagree? An estimated one billion people around the world eat chocolate every day. The average American consumes 12 pounds of the sweet stuff every year. But the topography of Ghana, Ivory Coast, and Côte d’Ivoire, where more than half of the world’s chocolate is sourced in the form of the cocoa bean, will be so different by 2050 that production will be seriously impacted.

The current optimum altitude for cocoa production is 100 to 250 meters above sea level (MASL). But according to a worrisome 2011 CIAT study, that figure will increase to between 450 and 500 MASL by 2050. The report’s authors warn that farmers might begin to see declines in cocoa production by 2030. Beyond impacting our chocolate consumption is the effect that this will have on cocoa farmers, many of whom rely on cocoa for their livelihoods. “Many of these farmers use their cocoa trees like ATM machines,” said Dr. Peter Laderach, the report’s lead author. “They pick some pods and sell them to quickly raise cash for school fees or medical expenses. The trees play an absolutely critical role in rural life.”

(image: menic181/Shutterstock.com)

7. Coffee

Coffee is ubiquitous. Around 8.5 million metric tons of coffee are grown in 60 countries on nearly every continent. Half a trillion tons of java are consumed every year. But people around the globe may have to find another stimulating beverage to start their day. In recent years, a deadly plant fungus called coffee rust has swept across Central America, cutting coffee production and seriously impacting local economies. Experts believe that the spread of the disease has been driven by higher temperatures brought on by climate change.

Coffee plantations around the world are dealing with increased incidences of fungi and invasive species due to higher temperatures. Coffee bean farms on the Kona coast of the Big Island in Hawaii are being ravaged by an insect called the coffee berry borer, which scientists say is “expected to become an even greater threat” due to climate change. And in Africa, scientists predict that the number of coffee-growing regions will decrease between 65 to 100 percent as the surface temperature increases. Actor Jim Carrey once said, “I wake up some mornings and sit and have my coffee and look out at my beautiful garden, and I go, ‘Remember how good this is. Because you can lose it.’” He probably wasn’t referring to climate change, but he might as well have been.

(image: inewsfoto/Shutterstock.com)

8. Peanut Butter

Billy Joel once quipped, “A peanut butter and jelly sandwich is better than bad sex.” Indeed, there are few things as immediately satisfying as a good PB&J. If you grew up in the U.S., you probably ate your share as a kid. But this simple and classic sammy could become a museum piece with climate change on track to push a number of wild relatives of plants, including the peanut, to extinction, according to a 2007 study.

Andy Jarvis, an agricultural geographer who led the study, said that flora like the peanut are more threatened by global warming since they grow mainly in flat areas; farmers would need to migrate significant distances to find cooler climates and that is not always possible. He points out the importance of maintaining seed banks to guard against the effects of climate change. “There is an urgent need to collect and store the seeds of wild relatives in crop diversity collections before they disappear,” he said. His call to action could be summed up neatly: Save the PB&J!

(image: Markus Mainka/Shutterstock.com)

9. Wine

If we don’t keep the increase of the global surface temperature to a maximum of 2°C (some say 1.5°C) to prevent the worst impacts of climate change, fermented grape juice from traditional winemaking regions could one day become a thing of the past. Grapevines are extremely sensitive to their surrounding environment: The variation in yield from season to season is more than 32 percent. And with temperatures steadily increasing, viniculture around the world is changing. Changes are already afoot in France, one of the largest wine producers in the world.

“Extreme weather is becoming more common in all of France’s wine-growing regions,” writes Ullrich Fichtner in Der Spiegel. “Heavy rains and hailstorms frequently come on the heels of summer heat waves and dry periods. Winters and nighttime temperatures are so mild that the plants are never able to rest. Few winegrowers continue to deny these tangible phenomena.” The famous wine appellation Châteauneuf-du-Pape is a striking example. As temperatures rise in the southern Rhône region, the harvest dates for this heavy wine have moved from October to early September. Philippe Guigal, one of the leading winemakers in the Rhône Valley, said that in the area where Châteauneuf-du-Pape grapes are grown, “the problems are getting really serious.”

But as climate change disrupts traditional winemaking regions worldwide, it will also create new ones, like Montana and China.

(image: Brent Hofacker/Shutterstock)

10. French Fries

Who doesn’t like french fries? Scratch that. Who doesn’t love french fries? But we may need to think about a different side to go with basically everything. In January, Vice News published a story with a very disturbing headline: “Climate Change Might Be the Greatest Threat to Potato Cultivation in 8,000 Years.” In Peru, home to thousands of potato species as well as the International Potato Center (CIP), based in Lima, potato farmers are being forced to move to higher altitudes due to rising surface temperatures. But even the Andes don’t rise forever. “I estimate that in 40 years there will be nowhere left to plant potatoes [in Peru’s highlands],” said Rene Gómez, curator of the CIP germplasm bank.

Of course, french fries aren’t the only thing the potato has given to the world. We could also lose such starchy staples as potato chips, baked potatoes, mashed potatoes, potato salad, home fries and hash browns. Many cultures across the globe would lose popular potato-based regional dishes, such as aloo gobi (India), boxty (Ireland), cottage pie (United Kingdom), gamjajeon (South Korea), gnocchi (Italy), gratin (France), knishes (Eastern Europe), patatas bravas (Spain), kroppkaka (Sweden) and massaman curry (Thailand), to name a few. In terms of human consumption, the potato is the world’s third most important food crop after rice and wheat. More than a billion people worldwide eat potato, and global total potato production exceeds 300 million metric tons.

Food may be one of the most apparent and immediate ways many of us will feel the impact of climate change. “The general story is that agriculture is sensitive,” said David Lobell, deputy director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University. “It’s not the end of the world, but it will be a big enough deal to be worth our concern.”

We certainly don’t need another reason to fight climate change. But a good one would be to save some of our favorite — and the world’s most important — foods from extinction.

Lose Weight in 7 Days on the Raw Food Diet Plan – Tips and Tricks to Succeed

Weight loss doesn’t have to be hard! By setting yourself a goal of sticking to your diet plan for 7 days and following these easy to manage steps you will be on your way to losing weight fast and creating a healthier you. By replacing a few of your undesirable eating habits with a new well balanced diet and incorporating some form of exercise into your daily routine, you will not only shed those unwanted kilos but have more energy and feel amazing.

You see, the Raw Food Diet Plan not only focuses on losing weight fast, its key objective is to ensure that you are eating nutrient dense foods with the nutrients and enzymes intact. And this is the reason why it works! When you concentrate more on your weight, you keep on gaining more weight instead. But if you switch your focus on health, you get the best out of it, not only healthy weight but cleansed system as well.

Will I starve with this diet plan?

Don’t worry, there will be a variety of food to choose from. You will have regular meals plus snacks. For you to enjoy and succeed in this diet program, follow these tips and tricks to ensure you have more than enough snacks to choose from.

Tips and Tricks to Succeed in 7-Days Raw Food Diet Plan

This diet program is not a harsh or extreme weight loss plan. This program aims to regain your vigour and energy, boost your immune system, eliminate stored fat and toxins and help you lose weight.

Drink plenty of water

Drink at least two liters of water per day. Drink in between meals to avoid diluting gastric juices during food digestion.

Drink a detoxifying tea

Drink green tea to enhance your detox.

Dry Brushing

Dry brushing will not only exfoliate your skin, it can also stimulate the little blood vessels under the skin and promote circulation. Before you take your shower, brush your body using a natural soft bristle brush in circular motion beginning from your extremities going to your heart.

Exercise

Shed some sweat at least once a week. If you cannot do your workout, go for a steam bath or sauna to make sure you are eliminating body toxins efficiently.

Vegetable Smoothies

Instead of coffee, start your day by making your own green smoothie. You can find lots of vegetable smoothies recipe online. You can also create your own recipe! Spinach is good for beginners because of its mild flavour. Be sure to alternate greens to enjoy a wide range of nutrients.

Never skip breakfast

Go easy with your body by having a green drink in the morning. If it is not enough or if you need an ample amount to start the day, eat fresh fruits or a vegetable wrap. Many people fear that they’re going to be hungry on a raw diet. However, there is a lot of filling food options you can try. Soaked oat groat is one of them. Eat 3 to 5 soaked groats for a sustained feeling. This is better than cooked oatmeal. Don’t forget to go easy and always drink green smoothie as your base meal every morning.

Quit coffee

Quitting coffee right away can be daunting task, especially if you are a ‘drinker’ for years. If you want to set yourself free from caffeine, cut it back. Begin with just one cup per day. Then gradually lessen the amount into half until you no longer crave for it.

Be ready for temptation

Don’t let the sugar craving blow your consistent raw experience. Have some fresh fruits to satisfy your sweet tooth. If that still doesn’t work, there are tasty raw desserts that you can try such as cocoa pudding, raw lemon bar and raw brownies! They are even tastier than many cooked foods.

Enjoy

The raw diet program should be a fun discovery of raw cuisine and not a frustrating challenge. Keep in mind that this is not only a weight loss program but a detoxifying diet. It is also empowering knowing you can learn how to make raw dishes with little effort. If you are stressed or busy, go for simple meals such as a green leafy salad that can be prepared the night before, ready for your busy day!

Before going raw, make sure to inform your health practitioner about the changes to your diet and only do what feels right for your body. Never starve yourself or take pills or clays to stimulate your digestive tract. A raw diet is just a healthy change in your typical diet and so, keep it simple and enjoy the benefits of the raw diet experience.

Leonardo DiCaprio is Being Called a 'Legend' for Raw Food He Tore Into in 'The … – IJ Review

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Leonardo DiCaprio and director Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s upcoming film “The Revenant” is sure to turn some heads with its gruesome, brutal, and incredible interpretation of the life of legendary explorer Hugh Glass.

According to legend, Glass was mauled by a grizzly bear in 1823 but managed to crawl 200 miles to exact revenge on the men who left him for dead.

Critics and fans alike are saying that this could be DiCaprio’s chance to finally win an Oscar his performance on screen, especially due to the grueling conditions of the shoot.

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Image Credit: YouTube Screenshot

Here are a few of the extreme things DiCaprio did for this movie, according to an interview with Variety:

  • Live with a massive beard for over a year,
  • Travel to remote locations for shoots.
  • Risk getting hypothermia regularly,
  • Work through illness,
  • And be covered in ants.

But perhaps the worst stunt (or normal life experience for some midwesterners) was eating a raw bison liver.

Image Credit: YouTube Screenshot

Image Credit: YouTube Screenshot

The 41-year-old actor was concerned about how authentic a fake liver would look, so he opted to take a bite out of a real one. He explained the deed to Variety:

“The bad part is the membrane around it. It’s like a balloon. When you bite into it, it bursts in your mouth.”

Gross.

Will this be DiCaprio’s crowning achievement?



More or less what Bella eats on a daily basis. Two vitamin tablets, a non liver fish oil supplement, Raw Meat (Whatever Meat I have at that time) roughly 10% of the dogs body weight in muscle meat. (Not shown here but she would get another piece of chicken later on). Eggs are a great way to add protein, fat and the shells are great for calcium. The shells also create “ruffage” that mimics the hairs and other natural objects that are ingested in the wild. Feeding raw has shown me great improvement in Bella’s energy levels, her skin and hair is very healthy, and most importantly her stool is so much dryer (a sign of great digestive health)

Hope you guys enjoy the video, as you see I’m no longer doing aquarium update videos BUT I can still answer any questions about freshwater that you may have. So bye for now, until next time. Enjoy.

Chi Yum Yum – Homemade raw food diet



I am not a veternarian, nor do I claim to be……
As a concerned mommie of 3 chihuahua’s (Gummie was adopted after this tutorial was made), I choose to know what’s in their diet. Owing all my knowledge to my sister and her many years of Animal Rescue and Hospice. Through her knowledge and experience, I am now highly educated to the FACT of all the extremely harmful ingredients in most store bought dog foods. With the help of my sister, we have come up with this recipe for our Raw Meat Diet and because many of our FB friends have asked me what I feed my furbabies, I am here to share this recipe with you. Please note that the meat part of this recipe can be slightly cooked if you prefer. Raw is better but it’s a personal choice. This recipe has worked wonderfully for us for many years and has been approved by my holistic vet.
Please note: in the video I said “3” lbs of raw meat. It is “6” lbs of meat. The recipe is 1/2 meat and 1/2 other mixture. ( meat should make up 1/2 the recipe). Vitamin, eggshell and coconut oil are added only once a day.
I really don’t measure the ingredients (other than the eggshell, vitamin mix & coconut oil). So long as you have 1/2 meat and 1/2 of the “mixture”, it’s all good.
Fruits and vegetables can be switched up periodically. NO ONIONS (toxic). No grapes (toxic).
When switching diets be sure to gradually ween off old food by slowly adding some new food to old food. Each day add more new and less old until it’s all new diet. This will prevent diarreah.
If you have any questions, Please message me on our FB page: