VTT’s vision of the era of smart and consumer-centric food production

We are moving into the era, where food production and digitalisation will merge to form a new food economy. The transition is already under way – led by consumers. Together with companies in the sector, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has created three change paths towards the Food Economy 4.0. They are based on identifed drivers and emerging technologies.


Internationalisation, urbanisation and ageing are transforming the consumers and the living environment. In the future must be produced for demanding consumers with clearly smaller environmental burden. Our future food will be based on more efficient use of ; foods are more plant based and made from novel kind of ingredients.

Digital technologies and services will be in a key position in Food Economy 4.0. Consumer-centric business activities will take into account individual needs and values. Smart online retail combined with agile distribution, new service models using emerging technologies, and customized food production close to the consumer are examples of the transition under way. Big Data combined with smart interaction between processes, actors and consumers via IoT is increasing convenience and transparency.

Together with food industry representatives, VTT’s multi-disciplinary team of experts has created three change paths for the transitioning food production and distribution, and presented new business opportunities based on these paths. The Food Economy 4.0 roadmap published by VTT in February 2017 describes new ways of thinking about the production, delivery and purchase of food.

From mass production to individual solutions

In addition to safe and tasty, consumers want healthy and easily available food. Ethical values and local production are also important. Digital services and production technologies will increase the possibilities of consumers to make product and service choices in line with their own needs and values. Combining personal and product data will enable matchmaking of one´s dietary needs with food offering. Smart packaging and automated monitoring of the quality and quantity of food will ease the lives of consumers both within and outside households.From traditional food supply chain to agile production and distribution

Personalised food production will also change production processes. Food supply is becoming a more networked and consumer-driven business environment. This transition is driven by digitalisation, new production, distribution technologies, and service-based business models.

Online platforms offer a cooperation channel and marketplace for producers capable of scaling their deliveries for end consumers or the food industry. New web-based solutions are creating market models in which small producers can connect to bigger consumer groups. The development of distribution and logistics systems plays a key role in agile food production.

In the new food economy food is more often prepared for the consumer directly, at the point of purchase. Grocery stores could have elements of production units. The current development of service robotics and 3D printing is improving the ability of vending machines to prepare personalised portions.

Well-being for the planet

In addition, ensuring food production while using natural resources sustainably is a global challenge. Centralised production, long transport distances and storage cause a great deal of waste at different stages of the current . Agile production and distribution with smart quality control can also tackle this challenge.

More efficient use of natural resources and food raw materials as well as novel solutions to produce food ingredients are in a key role of future food economy. Biotechnology and insect farming are valid examples of future production technologies. Transition from horizontal to vertical food production is accelerating.

Three change paths

VTT’s Food Economy 4.0 roadmap describes three change paths, which form an integrated ecosystem. Information flows in the ecosystem affect the consumer’s purchasing decisions while, through his or her purchasing decisions, the consumer can create an ecosystem in which raw materials are produced sustainably and used efficiently, with a view to the further processing of raw material flows.

Many examples show that we already are moving along change paths. The first to move and those who best serve the customer will be the winners in the new digital environment. In addition to cross-border technologies, out-of-box thinking and rapid prototyping pave the way ahead.


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New categorisation of food scares will help efficient development of strategies to prevent food chain being compromised

Go raw Monday night – Chronicle Journal: Local News

Heather Pace wants people to know you can have your cake and eat it too.

Hailing from Sioux Lookout, the author and chef will be in Thunder Bay to discuss and teach her love of raw foods on Monday.

Raw food in the culinary world is plant based and not raw meat. It “is basically a diet made up of fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and sprouted grains, and that’s it,” Pace told The Chronicle-Journal.

A dehydrator is used for a lot of cooking with raw food, with a temperature of up to 118 F (47 C). This is used to make things like pizza crusts, cookies and crackers.

A food processor or a blender are the appliances used in raw food preparation.

Pace claims she can replicate any dish using raw vegan ingredients.

Lasagna, pizza, pasta, fajitas, nachos, cheese cakes, cookies, chocolate and milkshakes are among the possibilities, she said.

“Trying the food is what really wins people over and seeing it, because it is beautiful, so colourful, so vibrant, and it tastes as good as it looks.”

The concept of raw food is becoming more mainstream, according to Pace, with raw food restaurants in every city and spreading all over the world. It’s the diet of many celebrities.

As for a diet, it is one that works for almost anyone excluding those with a nut allergy.

The food is gluten free, refined sugar free, dairy free, egg free, soy free, making it a good fit for people who have food allergies.

Her Thunder Bay class will be about the benefits of raw food in people’s diets and how to make it fun.

The class will take place at Bliss Cafe (87 Cumberland St. N.) from 6 to 8 p.m. on Monday. Tickets cost $65 and are available at Bliss Cafe.

Pace will be at Bliss Cafe the day before and the day of her class to meet people and talk about raw food.

Mace Dekker: Which is better for pets, raw or processed diet?

What are raw food diets?

Raw food diets for pets may consist of raw meat, organs, bones, eggs, fruits, and vegetables. They may be home-prepared or commercially available. Commercial raw food diets can be purchased fresh or frozen. Home-prepared raw diets are variable, depending on the education, availability of ingredients, time, and sanitary processes of the pet owner.

What are commercially processed pet foods?

Commercially processed pet food uses varied, tested recipes consisting of animal renderings, grains, cereals, and vegetables. They are cooked to create consistency among batches, to control pathogens, and to decrease spoilage. The process allows for flavor and texture enhancement and refortification of any lost nutrients. Commercially processed pet foods are often made to meet the specific dietary needs of pets’ various life stages, including puppy/kitten, adult, active, senior, and more. Some also help meet the dietary needs of pets who suffer from various health conditions.

Which food is best for pets?

Supporters of raw food diets point out that the wild cousins of dogs and cats thrive on raw food. They note that raw foods have been used for years in zoos, mink farms, and dog racing facilities. They attribute modern pet health problems, such as periodontal disease, allergies, obesity, digestive problems, and more, to today’s highly processed, grain-based commercial pet foods.

But several major veterinary and human health organizations, including the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), discourage feeding raw food diets. AAHA specifically does not advocate nor endorse feeding pets any raw or dehydrated nonsterilized foods, including treats that are of animal origin.

Why? AAHA notes that studies on both commercially available and homemade raw protein diets have found that 30–50 percent of them are contaminated with pathogenic organisms, and up to 30 percent of the dogs that are fed such diets may shed pathogenic organisms in their stool.

Many pathogens found in raw protein diets can be transmitted to any humans who come into contact with the food itself, the pet, or environmental surfaces.

What’s a pet owner to do?

With both sides of the raw food diet debate advocating so strongly, what is the average pet owner to do? What is the best and safest option when it comes to pet food?

Some experts believe that raw food diets can be fed safely and effectively as long as owners are counseled correctly on preparation and handling and the situations are appropriate. One might be cautious, however, about feeding a puppy or kitten a raw food diet as a fast-growing animal has significant nutrient requirements that may not be met. Likewise, a raw-food diet may not be a good idea for a pregnant animal.

Other experts point to the problems. Raw food can increase the risk of health issues. The issues can be limited—gastric, vomiting, flatulence, diarrhea—or they can be fatal, depending on the degree of the situation. Cooking food reduces the risk of bacterial contamination and helps break down the food so that it is more digestible for the animal. Pet owners also need to be cautious about removing any bones, which can cause obstructions.

The larger risk, however, is whether the home-prepared raw diet is nutritionally complete. Over the lifetime of an animal, a chronic shortage of certain nutrients can lead to conditions such as vitamin deficiencies and abnormal bone growth.

Raw food proponents point to pet food recalls and note that commercial pet food can pass along diseases as well. However, there is no way to track problems with pets on homemade diets.

If you are considering a raw food diet for your pet

Talk with your veterinarian about creating a nutritionally balanced and complete diet for the long-term health of your pet. If your veterinarian is not trained in nutrition, ask for a referral to a veterinary nutritionist. Don’t rely on texts and websites as they are often inadequate. Be aware, however, that many veterinary nutritionists do not believe in feeding raw diets.

Ultimately, what you feed your pet is your decision. Most of the experts, however, recommend a nutritionally balanced, commercially processed pet food to keep your pet happy and healthy.

Excerpted from PetsMatter, the blog of the American Animal Hospital Association.

Grass Valley Veterinary Hospital’s Mace Dekker, D.V.M. will consider your questions each month in Vet Tips. Have a question? Submit it to [email protected].

Hollywood elite’s dangerous diets in the 20th century

It is easy to think that today’s celebrity obsession with gluten-free and raw-food diets is new or extreme.

But turn the clock back 60 or even 70 years and you’ll see celebrities such as Marilyn Monroe using dangerous, extreme and very strange means to lose weight and attain what they considered the elusive perfect figure.

Of course, these diets trickled down to the masses and there are stories abound of these very punishing and peculiar regimens – from ingesting a tapeworm to chewing food 700 times before spitting it out.

Food and nutrition historian Helen Zoe Veit who has studied the 20th century for close to 15 years says this period was riddled with ridiculous and strange diets because men and women alike coveted the slimmer figures of those they saw in media.

She told DailyMail.com: ‘The rise of celebrity culture in our country is inseparable from the rise of visual culture, where suddenly photographs and moving pictures and advertisements…were all starting to appear at the same time.’

‘Reprinting photography in cheap mass market publications in newspapers and magazines which was happening by the 1920s and 1930s, those all contributed to celebrity culture…and to the rise of thinness as an ideal.’ 

Soon, these diets took a dangerous turn. 

The quest for the perfect figure was so widespread because the 20th century marked the beginnings of mass media and celebrity culture.  Monroe is seen on a poster here in lingerie and a silk bathrobe, promoting the 1953 movie How to Marry a Millionaire

The quest for the perfect figure was so widespread because the 20th century marked the beginnings of mass media and celebrity culture.  Monroe is seen on a poster here in lingerie and a silk bathrobe, promoting the 1953 movie How to Marry a Millionaire

Twentieth century celebrities used dangerous, extreme and absurd diets to lose weight and attain the oh-so-elusive perfect figure. Hollywood Icon Elizabeth Taylor (pictured on the left in 1951) revealed her absurd diet which included steak and peanut butter sandwiches as well as cottage cheese and sour cream

Twentieth century celebrities used dangerous, extreme and absurd diets to lose weight and attain the oh-so-elusive perfect figure. Hollywood Icon Elizabeth Taylor (pictured on the left in 1951) revealed her absurd diet which included steak and peanut butter sandwiches as well as cottage cheese and sour cream

The tapeworm diet: How 390lbs opera singer Maria Callas was widely believed to have resorted to this to become a svelte ‘beauty’, shedding 90lbs in one year

Growing in popularity around the 1940s, the tapeworm diet involved swallowing a live tapeworm with the hope that it would absorb the food consumed, leading to weight loss.

In her quest to sport a thinner figure, New York soprano and food lover Maria Callas shed close to 90lbs within a year by apparently swallowing a tapeworm.

When Callas first entered the opera world in 1947, she was fully comfortable with her 390-pound figure – which is considered well into the obesity category by today’s standards – because opera singers were generally known to be heavy.

She soon felt the pressure to look thin after a cinema director Luchino Visconti said he would not work until she shed about 70lbs. She too sensed the urgency to drop the weight when she realized her figure was getting in the way of performing. 

In an interview with English conductor Edward Downes, Callas revealed: 'I was getting so heavy that even my vocalizing was getting heavy.'

Callas' 390lb weight is considered well into the obesity category by today's standards

Yearning to sport a thinner figure, New York soprano and food lover Maria Callas lost close to 90lbs within a year by apparently using this diet. The picture on the right shows her in 1952 when she was heavier and the one on the left shows her in 1958 after her drastic weight loss

Callas first entered the opera world in 1947 weighing 390-pounds. She soon sensed the urgency to drop the weight a cinema director Luchino Visconti said he would not work until she shed about 70lbs. Here she is pictured in 1952

Callas first entered the opera world in 1947 weighing 390-pounds. She soon sensed the urgency to drop the weight a cinema director Luchino Visconti said he would not work until she shed about 70lbs. Here she is pictured in 1952

In an interview with English conductor Edward Downes, Callas revealed: ‘I was getting so heavy that even my vocalizing was getting heavy.

‘I was tiring myself, I was perspiring too much, and I was really working too hard. And I wasn’t really well, as in health; I couldn’t move freely.

‘And then I was tired of playing a game, for instance playing this beautiful young woman, and I was heavy and uncomfortable to move around.’

Callas shed more than 100lbs in such a short space of time that rumors swirled she had ingested a tapeworm to lose the weight. Callas eventually rejected these diet rumors and said her weight loss was due to healthy eating but the rumors still continued, especially after those in the star’s circle revealed the soprano had been treated for worms.

Dr Tanya Zuckerbrot, a celebrity nutritionist of 20 years who has worked with Megyn Kelly and Katie Couric, says ingesting a tapeworm – which is popular in Mexico and can cost as much as $1500 – has serious health implications on the body.

Speaking about the parasite found in the undercooked meat of infected animals, she said: ‘Tapeworms can lead to cysticercosis, an infection caused by cysts and can impair the brain muscle and cause paralysis.

‘The tapeworm can also lead to the malabsorption of nutrients and can cause nutrient deficiency.’

The effects of the tapeworm diet was not the focus of attention after Callas lost the weight however. It was her newly thin figure. Lauded by those in the opera industry, including internationally renowned opera singer Tito Gabi who praised her new ‘awareness’ to the roles Callas played.

‘She was not only supremely gifted both musically and dramatically—she was a beauty too,’ he said. 

‘And her awareness of this invested with fresh magic every role she undertook.’ 

She would even host  very glamorous dinner parties, but would only handpick bits of food while her guests tucked into their meals.  She is pictured here with Aristotle Onassis  in 1965 - her ex-husband who left her to marry the widowed Jackie Kennedy

She would even host  very glamorous dinner parties, but would only handpick bits of food while her guests tucked into their meals.  She is pictured here with Aristotle Onassis  in 1965 – her ex-husband who left her to marry the widowed Jackie Kennedy

Callas may have lost her weight but she still maintained an insatiable appetite.  The newly svelte soprano singer would collect recipes of her favorite meals  – including tomato omelets, golden pound cake, chocolate beignets and a cake – from cooks around the world but would never eat them.

‘Writing down these recipes was a vicarious pleasure because she rarely allowed herself to taste any of them,’ a Callas expert told The Guardian. 

She would even host elaborate and glamorous dinner parties, but would only handpick bits of food while her guests tucked into their meals.

While she had developed a regimen with her diet, the star’s personal life was in tatters after her husband Aristotle Onassis left her for the widowed Jackie Kennedy – although Onassis and Callas would apparently still have affairs after their separation.

Callas clung to her healthy lifestyle up until her death in Paris aged 53 in 1977.

Marilyn’s got the munchies: Raw eggs whisked in milk for breakfast and evening trips to the ice cream parlor 

By the 1950s, fuller-figured women were heralded as the beauty standard. Still, the extreme diets continued. 

Celebrated as one of the most beautiful women of her time, even Marilyn Monroe – who was a healthy 8 1/2 stone in her prime – was not immune to the pressure to stay in shape. The 5ft 5 1/2 inch blonde beauty resorted to having raw eggs whisked in milk as breakfast to maintain her figure.

In a September 1952 edition of the now-defunct Pageant magazine Monroe spoke of her ‘bizarre’ choice for breakfast that included whisking raw eggs and milk together.

She said: ‘I have been told my eating habits are absolutely bizarre….but I don’t think so.

‘I doubt if any doctor could recommend a more nourishing breakfast for a working girl in a hurry.’ 

Dr. Zuckerbrot says anyone who resolves to replicating this diet faces serious health risks.

She told DailyMail.com: ‘I don’t think you should do this diet period….It’s a safety issue which is that raw eggs are notorious for containing salmonella.’

Monroe  resorted to drinking milk whisked with eggs for breakfast to maintain her figure.  Posing for the now defunct Pageant Magazine, the blonde beauty - lying effortlessly on a bed while showing her go-to breakfast - told the publication in 1952: 'I doubt if any doctor could recommend a more nourishing breakfast for a working girl in a hurry'

Monroe  resorted to drinking milk whisked with eggs for breakfast to maintain her figure.  Posing for the now defunct Pageant Magazine, the blonde beauty – lying effortlessly on a bed while showing her go-to breakfast – told the publication in 1952: ‘I doubt if any doctor could recommend a more nourishing breakfast for a working girl in a hurry’

For dinner, Monroe traded her raw eggs for broiled liver and carrots but the blonde beauty developed a habit of stopping by an ice cream parlor for a hot fudge sundae in the evenings. Pictured above in 1952  tasting a cake, the actress said: 'I'm sure that I couldn't allow myself this indulgence were it not that my normal diet is composed almost totally of protein foods'

For dinner, Monroe traded her raw eggs for broiled liver and carrots but the blonde beauty developed a habit of stopping by an ice cream parlor for a hot fudge sundae in the evenings. Pictured above in 1952  tasting a cake, the actress said: ‘I’m sure that I couldn’t allow myself this indulgence were it not that my normal diet is composed almost totally of protein foods’

This nutritionist who the rich and famous have paid as much as $1,000 per consultation to help with their diet says that one would need to make amendments to Monroe’s diet to avoid unnecessary weight gain and to reduce the risks of food poisoning. 

‘I would say cook the egg….it doesn’t change the caloric content or change the nutrient density,’ Zuckerbrot explained.

‘If you are going to have the milk, don’t use whole milk because it is a source of saturated fat….at least use skim milk.’

For her evening meals, Monroe was slightly more tame with her food choice. She traded her raw eggs and milk for broiled liver and raw vegetables (carrots were her favorite).

Whereas today celebrities such as Gwyneth Paltrow have spoken of eliminating unhealthy treats, Monroe was not shy to admit her ice cream indulgence. The blonde beauty told the magazine interview about her habit of stopping by Wil Wright’s Ice Cream Parlor for a hot fudge sundae after her evening drama classes.

Although it closed down by the mid-Seventies, this popular ice cream chain in Southern California – frequented by many other celebrities including Frank Sinatra – was known for its uber rich ice cream that contained 22 percent butter fat – almost twice the amount you would expect to find in your ice cream today. 

Still, Monroe could fit a size eight around her 24 1/2-inch waist. Perhaps it was the starlet’s 10-minute workout that killed off those ice cream calories. Each morning she would lift five-pound weights about 15 times until she ‘was tired’ but never engaged in sports because she preferred to ‘leave those things to men’.

‘I couldn’t stand exercise if I had to feel regimented about it,’ Monroe said. ‘I have never cared especially for outdoor sports, and have no desire to excel at tennis, swimming, or golf. I’ll leave those things to the men.’

I want you, I need you: Elvis Presley’s obsession with 8,000-calorie fried peanut butter and bacon sandwiches (which he would even indulge in at  2 am) before sleeping for up to three days at a time

Today Hollywood stars such as Chris Pratt and sport legends such as Tom Brady are celebrated for their masculine physique. This coveted masculine trend has been undeviating for the last two to three decades but in the context of history, it is just a recent trend. 

During the 1960s, men rather vied for a thinner frame sported by celebrities such as the 150-pound Paul McCartney.

Back then, Elvis Presley was an impressive 6 feet tall and weighed 170lbs. But soon his drug problem and eating habits caused him to balloon to 260lbs.

Presley’s eating habits were incredulous to say the least. For breakfast, the Mississippi native would down homemade biscuits fried in butter, sausage patties, four scrambled eggs, sometimes with fried bacon.

Presley’s cook Mary Jenkins revealed in a 1995 documentary that his go-to sandwich was toasted bread, peanut butter , slices of banana and several strips of bacon fried in a huge dollop of butter. 

During the 1960s, men rather vied for a thinner frame sported by celebrities such as the 150-pound Paul McCartney

Presley¿s diet was so ridiculous meals were named after him. One of which, called Elvis' Party Meatballs

Elvis Presley was an impressive 6 feet tall and weighed 170lbs in the 1950s (right) but soon his drug problem and eating habits caused him to gain weight. He is pictured in the left in 1977, around the time he had ballooned to 260lbs

His go-to sandwich was toasted bread, peanut butter and slices of banana and sometimes he would even include several strips of bacon

His go-to sandwich was toasted bread, peanut butter and slices of banana and sometimes he would even include several strips of bacon

Other times she would remix this recipe and would eat hollowed out loaves of bread filled with a full jar of peanut butter, a full jar of grape jelly and a full pound of bacon – and a single sandwich was a whopping 8,000 calories, the amount of calories a healthy man is supposed to consume over three days.

Remembering times when Presley would call her at ungodly hours asking for his sandwiches.

‘If he wanted them in a morning when he woke up I would have to fix them, if he wanted them at 2 in the morning I would still have to still fix it for him,’ she said.

Neither time nor place mattered to Presley when it came to food. Jenkins recalled a time when he asked her for to slip in unhealthy meals while he had been admitted to the hospital and was supposed to be eating only healthy foods. 

Presley’s diet was so ridiculous that meals were named after him. One of which, called Elvis’ Party Meatballs, was a large slab of ground beef wrapped in bacon and it was apparently the country icon’s favorite snack.

To shed those close to 100lbs he gained, Presley – who admitted to his cook that food was the only thing that made him happy – was rumored to adopt an extreme take on the increasingly popular Sleeping Beauty diet, which claims that the number of hours you sleep can determine whether or not you lose weight.

He would apparently sleep for three days to avoid eating and to fit into his trademark white jumpsuit. 

On two occasions in 1973 however, it was the star’s deadly drug addictions and not his yearning to lose weight that would leave him in a coma for days.

Eventually, his unusual eating habits and drug abuse caused Presley to suffer from a serious condition of constipation, glaucoma, high blood pressure, liver damage, and an enlarged colon. 

On the last night Jenkins saw Presley, he surprised her when he said he didn’t want to eat anything want to eat anything. The next morning, on August 1977, Presley was found dead.

Elizabeth Taylor’s diet of steak slathered with peanut butter and extreme amounts of cottage cheese and sour cream

But many celebrities have been on the other end of extreme diets. Rather than consume unusual amounts of food, so many have opted to take out entire food groups.

The protein-heavy diet has been the classic regimen sworn by celebrities as the perfect diet for years. 

Mariah Carey raised eyebrows last year when she announced she stuck to lox and capers as her meals.

Elizabeth Taylor’s diet renders Mariah’s normal. She was the Hollywood icon who every woman wanted to be and every man wanted to be with but in the last 20 years of her life she weighed over 180lbs after an injury left her bedridden and made her prone to ‘stuffing’ herself with fried chicken and fancy desserts.

She stayed immobile for most of her injury and she gained more than 25lbs because she 'stuffed' herself with fried chicken and fancy desserts

The absurdity went up a notch especially for her  dinner which consisted of  fried chicken, peas, biscuits, gravy, mashed potatoes, corn bread, homemade potato chips, trifle, and a tumbler full of Jack Daniels

She stayed immobile for most of her injury because she ‘stuffed’ herself with fried chicken and fancy desserts. Pictured on the left in 1951, Taylor weighed 120lbs and her indulgence would have been fine but in later years, she (pictured on the right in 1979) gained more than 25lbs

Taylor - pictured here in 1976 - decided to take control of her diet after her seventh marriage and resorted to extreme diets such as having cottage cheese and sour cream as well as steak and peanut butter for dinner

Taylor – pictured here in 1976 – decided to take control of her diet after her seventh marriage and resorted to extreme diets such as having cottage cheese and sour cream as well as steak and peanut butter for dinner

In her book Elizabeth Takes Off, published in 1988, the Hollywood icon said she was trying to lose weight to reclaim her self esteem

In her book Elizabeth Takes Off, published in 1988, the Hollywood icon said she was trying to lose weight to reclaim her self esteem

In the 1960s, when Taylor weighed 120lbs, her indulgence would have been normal. During this time, her eating habits were more so absurd than they were unhealthy.

 For breakfast, she would down scrambled eggs, bacon, and a mimosa for breakfast. Hollowed-out French bread filled with peanut butter and bacon was her go-to lunch meal. 

The absurdity went up a notch especially for her  dinner which consisted of  fried chicken, peas, biscuits, gravy, mashed potatoes, corn bread, homemade potato chips, trifle, and a tumbler full of Jack Daniels.

Taylor – who married eight times – decided to take control of her diet after her seventh marriage and resorted to extreme diets such as having cottage cheese and sour cream as well as steak and peanut butter for dinner. She detailed recipes to her very absurd diet in her book, Elizabeth Takes Off.

Describing her book which was published in 1988, she said: ‘It is more than a specific program for weight loss; it’s a chance for you to throw away old self-destructive habits and embrace a more positive way of life.’

She would maintain her diet until she passed away aged 79 in 2011.

Although celebrities boast of their adherence to such extreme diets, Dr. Zuckerbrot says the practice of taking out certain foods like carbohydrates is not the best way to lose weight.

Author of The F-Factor Diet: Discover the Secret to Permanent Weight Loss, Zuckerbrot says it’s rather important to incorporate fiber into your meal.

Speaking of the diet that has been strictly followed by Megyn Kelly and Miss USA contestants, Zuckerbrot said the fiber acts like a ‘broom’ and cleanses the body of toxins.

She said: ‘Fiber is nature’s detox – working like both broom and sponge to collect and remove toxins quickly, efficiently… and automatically.’

‘Fiber provides a vast amounts of health benefits from lowering cholesterol, keeping us full, controlling blood sugar, and lowering risk for certain types of cancer such as colon and breast cancer.’ 

Raw Food Chef Heather Pace

When it comes to sweets, there’s not a chocolate brownie we won’t indulge in every so/often. But how about one without sugar, butter or flour? Enter Sweetly Raw Desserts by Heather Pace: a Canadian classically trained chef and raw-dessert maker extraordinaire. Packed with a variety of delicious recipes (from vegan chocolate mousse to chocolate peanut butter cups), we recently got a chance to ask Heather about her new book and get her best tricks for newbie raw-foodies like us. —Aurea Dempsey

heather pace

When we hear raw desserts, we think expensive ingredients like raw cocoa, hemp, goji berries, dates and coconut oil. Any budgeting tips you can share?

Fortunately these ingredients have become so popular that you can find them in almost any grocery store, and places have become competitive with their pricing. I recommend buying in bulk where possible, and searching online (Amazon, for example) for good deals. Since all of these dry goods last a long time, you won’t risk wasting anything if you buy a more than a pound at a time.

Many of the recipes featured in your book look sinfully delicious! What are your go-tos?

My favourite go-to recipes in my book include the chocolate chip cookies, peanut butter and jelly smoothie, chocolate sauce (I always keep a jar of it in my fridge), key lime pie bars and caramel peanut chocolate bars (which are just like Snickers!).

We’re always trying to watch our sugar intake … without giving up our love for chocolate. Any tips on keeping natural sugars on the lower end?

To keep sugar on the low end, I suggest using fruit more than concentrated sweeteners such as coconut nectar. Fruit is packed with nutrition and fibre to keep a person feeling full. A banana spread with some almond butter is absolutely delicious. A piece of dark chocolate paired with some nuts makes a perfect sweet treat, too—and, of course, the darker the chocolate the less sugar it has. A person can always lessen the amount of sweetener called for in a recipe, too.

From soaking nuts to dehydrating veggies, what cooking tools do you recommend for beginners?

For beginners I always recommend a high-speed blender and a food processor. With a good blender (I’m a Vitamix girl) sitting at $500, it’s an investment, but it’s cheaper than burning out five regular blenders. It’s also hands-down better for turning cashews into silky smooth cheesecake filling or blending spinach and fruit into a perfectly creamy smoothie. A decent food processor can be purchased for as little as $90 and is needed for things like power balls, brownies, cakes and nut butter. A dehydrator is another great tool to have as it acts like an oven for raw-food prep.

We hear you’re no longer a vegan, now eating meat. So clearly, one need not be 100 per cent raw to enjoy your recipes! Can you elaborate?

Yes that’s right. After 13 years of veganism I eat meat now. My health suffered a great deal and I needed to change my diet in order to heal. Seventy-five to 80 per cent of what I eat is plant based but I do need some animal protein to feel my best. When I made the shift about six years ago I nervously shared my story on my vegan blog. I was amazed that so many people were dealing the same issues that I was and I was lucky to get a great deal of support. Regardless of a person’s diet, I think we would all do well to add more raw and vegan food in. When people try my raw food for the first time they are amazed at how delicious it is and are often inspired to learn how to make it. Any cooked dish can be made raw: lasagna, fajitas, nachos, pasta, sushi, pizza, chocolate bars, granola … anything!

Besides tasting delicious, are there health benefits to eating raw desserts?

Yes! Raw desserts are made up of things like nuts, fruit, cacao and coconut, which are all full of vitamins, minerals, healthy fats, fibre and enzymes. The body recognizes it as real food and is able to process it. These treats are so healthy that you can eat them for breakfast—ironically, a healthier option than a muffin. Imagine that? Coconut oil is used in a lot of the desserts and is known to help burn fat. So we could almost call this weight-loss food! But seriously, I have friends who have ditched the processed stuff, converted to eating raw desserts and have lost weight as a result of it. These desserts give a person energy instead of an energy slump like refined white flour/sugar treats. They also promote a natural glow to hair, skin and nails due to the high concentration of nutrients that work from the inside of the body out.

sweetlyraw.com

Juicy Kitchen in Ann Arbor offers fresh, healthy food with new owners

ANN ARBOR, MI – The Juicy Kitchen Café has new ownership and they are pledging to uphold the values and quality of the west side restaurant.

Located at 1506 N. Maple near Miller Avenue in Ann Arbor, Juicy Kitchen is now in the hands of business partners Miko Fossum and Phil Flynn after owners Susan and George Todoroff decided to sell.

Juicy Kitchen was started by the Todoroffs in 2013 as a home delivery service and now serves breakfast and lunch on a daily basis, including items like breakfast sliders and a roasted eggplant Mediterranean sandwich.

A message on the Juicy Kitchen website informs customers of the ownership change and provides a few updates on what they can expect from Juicy Kitchen in the future.

“We will be adding a few new touches, including new menu items featuring plant based foods, green smoothies, elixirs and healthy treats and will begin hosting regular evening events like dinners with live music. We also plan to bring back prepared meals to go.”

A raw foods chef employed by Juicy Kitchen, Fossum also operates her own raw food catering and consulting business on the side, and Flynn works as a contractor and property manager on his own side business.

Fossum previously owned Magdalena’s Tea House in Lansing, where she learned of her passion for healthy food and a healthy community.

“This idea of community has been a life-long thread that has moved through all the remarkable projects I have been involved with,” Fossum said in a statement. “And just as food and community go hand in hand, I wanted to feed my family and friends delicious, healthy fresh foods, fast and easy to prepare.”

That was the starting vision of Juicy Kitchen for former owner Susan Todoroff, who was working in a career as a personal trainer and fitness instructor and discovered some of her clients were unable to eat better because of time constraints.

The food delivery business was soon born, honing the skills Todoroff acquired at the Schoolcraft Culinary Arts. She remembers the opportunity to open a brick-and-mortar restaurant, and the hundreds upon hundreds of hours she and her husband spent making Juicy Kitchen a success and staple in the Ann Arbor community.

When the sale was announced, Todoroff expressed her thanks to their regulars and staff and said it would be a “difficult transition” for her to let go of ownership of Juicy Kitchen and head into the next adventure of retirement.

“My vision was to create a cozy, welcoming space with a menu of creative, gourmet, healthy breakfast and lunch, serving great coffee and espresso drinks, with a super friendly staff,” Todoroff said in a statement. “I’m happy to have achieved this.”

7 Foods To Always Eat Raw For More Health Benefits

The benefits surrounding raw foodism are becoming more and more apparent. Although the word “diet” is often thrown around, I prefer to use the word lifestyle. As you become someone who appreciates raw food in its natural state, you promote healthier habits. Although it may seem as though raw foods are the “in thing,” raw foodism is anything but trendy. Have you explored the benefits associated with this lifestyle choice?

If not, here’s why you should, as well as some of the foods you should always eat raw.

Where you source your food is important

The undeniable health benefits associated with raw foods aren’t shocking. I mean, if you mainly consume dark leafy greens, sea vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds, all in their natural state, you bet you’re going to be healthier than someone who lives off of frozen pizza and chicken nuggets.

Okay, so that much is clear. But how beneficial is raw foodism? Before I touch on some of the associated benefits, I just want to mention the importance of where you source your food. You can eat and eat and eat, but if the fruits and vegetables you’re eating are depleted nutritionally, you’re not doing yourself any favors. So please, source organic raw foods close to home. They will be more nutrient-dense and will support local family-run farms.

Not all cooked foods are “dead” in the sense that they’re void of nutrients, but there is a long list of foods that are much more beneficial when they’re uncooked or prepared below a temperature of 116 degrees Fahrenheit. Within this range, raw foods will maintain levels of essential nutrients and enzymes.  

The benefits of raw food

A raw foods diet can significantly improve your overall health.

A raw foods diet can significantly improve your overall health.

Plenty of research has been conducted on this subject, showcasing the following benefits:

  • Uncooked “living foods” have been shown to significantly enhance weight loss. In turn, this supports disease prevention — especially cardiovascular complications.
  • A raw vegan diet can decrease LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels.
  • An uncooked vegan diet has shown favorable effects on fecal microflora — associated with a healthy immune system and reduced cancer risk.
  • Consuming more raw foods will enhance energy levels, prevent deficiencies and improve digestion.

Whether you suffer from arthritis or heart disease, a raw food diet can significantly improve your overall health and quality of life — but where do you begin? What foods are best eaten raw?

7 foods you should always eat raw

As you review the list below, none of the suggestions are shocking by any means. In all honesty, I think that’s the issue. We know that certain foods are good for us,  yet we ignore the power they have in terms of the way they can make us feel, and in turn, live.

Begin with this list, incorporating these foods into your daily diet. From there, expand your knowledge and understanding of raw foods. Baby steps turn into leaps and bounds, remember that! Of course, this is not a definitive list. There are many foods that can benefit your health when eaten raw — but these seven are a great place to start. 

Related: Is A Raw Food Diet For You?

1. Fruit

This is a wide category, but overall, there isn’t much research that showcases the benefits of cooking fruit. Consuming berries, citrus fruits, melon and other ingredients in their raw state is highly recommended. In fact, you should be eating at least five to six servings of fruit daily, focusing on low-glycemic options.

Although the jury is still out on whether or not a tomato is a fruit or vegetable, many agree that it is, in fact, a fruit. This is one food that you should cook in order to obtain higher levels of lycopene — a potent antioxidant. That doesn’t mean you should avoid raw tomatoes, but if you have the option, this is a unique circumstance. Cooked tomatoes are ideal.

2. Red peppers

Raw foods like red peppers contain nutrients like vitamin C.

Raw foods like red peppers contain nutrients like vitamin C.

My pug loves red peppers, he can’t get enough of ‘em. We eat raw peppers almost daily, and for good reason! Unfortunately, when peppers are cooked above 300 degrees Fahrenheit or so, their nutritional value breaks down. In order to preserve the vitamin C, lightly sauté or eat raw with hummus. If you’re tired of hummus, try some of these amazing bean dips.

3. Onions

Like garlic, which we will discuss next, onions contain high levels of allicin — a compound that’s known for its cancer-fighting and immune-boosting properties. Both red and white onions are recommended in order to obtain enough quercetin, another potent antioxidant. Once cooked, however, these key nutrients and enzymes are destroyed. Add raw onion to your salads, soups and sandwiches — they add a nice textural component as well!

4. Garlic

I’m no stranger to raw garlic — especially when I’m feeling a bit ill. Once again, high in the biologically active compound known as allicin, you will achieve greater absorption when consumed raw. Once cooked, the enzyme that supports the formation of allicin will become inactivated. Toss a chopped clove into your smoothies, or combine with olive oil and lemon juice for a simple homemade salad dressing.

5. Coconut

Raw foods like coconut are high in protein, iron, folate and more.

Raw foods like coconut are high in protein, iron, folate and more.

The coconut craze isn’t going to die down anytime soon — why would it? Although coconut oil has taken the health and beauty world by storm, fewer Americans consume coconut in its raw, natural state. The white “meat” from a coconut is high in protein, iron, folate, fiber, potassium and so much more. When consumed raw, it’s easier to digest and is highly recommended within a vegan diet.

6. Broccoli

Although many like to slather their cooked broccoli with cheese, this seems counterproductive. When consumed raw, broccoli provides your body with an optimal dose of sulforaphane — an anti-cancer compound. When cooked, this beneficial nutrient becomes almost “locked” in, becoming less available to your body. This is also true for other cruciferous vegetables, such as cauliflower, kale and Brussels sprouts.

7. Nuts and seeds

Acting as a great source of healthy fats, protein, and other key vitamins and minerals, regular consumption of raw nuts and seeds will most certainly support positive health. Some of the best options include, but are not limited to:

  • Macadamia: When consumed raw, you will benefit from high amounts of manganese, vitamin B1, oleic acid (a healthy fatty acid) and magnesium.
  • Walnuts: When you eat just 1/4 cup of walnuts, you will obtain 100 percent of your daily recommended intake of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids. Also, when consuming walnuts fresh from the shell, don’t remove the white, almost waxy skin. It contains up to 90 percent of the nut’s antioxidants.
  • Pumpkin seeds: We eat pumpkin seeds on our salad pretty much every evening, as they are known to be nutritional powerhouses. High in zinc, they’re known to promote healthy cell development and enhance both immune, thyroid and reproductive function.

Some other options include almonds, hemp seeds and Brazil nuts. You should also consume organic whenever possible — especially when consuming pistachios. These nuts often undergo a bleaching process to reduce the natural staining effects of the tannins which are released post-harvest.

See, I told you, none of these foods are weird or foreign. On that note, ask yourself, why am I not eating more of them? In order to take control of your health, you need to take action. Add the above foods to this week’s shopping list and continue to build healthier eating habits.

I mean, c’mon, you can’t argue with Hippocrates: “Nature itself is the best physician.”

— Krista Hillis

Raw and uncensored: A day on the set of Andy and Ben Eat Australia : SBS Food

It’s noon at the Queen Victoria Market, mid-way through Andy Allen and Ben Milbourne’s month-long eating epic across Australia, and the crowd lining up at the American Doughnut Kitchen is about to get a taste of food TV, 2017 style.

The first-names-only pair is ambling through the late-November throngs like any couple of young guys with a mutual love of food and denim – except for the two cameramen weaving backwards in front of them, trying not to bump into shoppers as they capture the duo taking their place in the queue and insisting the young woman behind the counter takes their money as she waves it politely away.

A taste of the debut season of Andy and Ben Eat Australia – the successor to 2015’s Andy and Ben Eat the World – it’s cinema verite gone foodie: a likeable warts-and-all, blooper-friendly antidote to the high-gloss productions that scramble for screen time.

The food genre is too polished and we’re trying to show the looseness.

Key word? Likeability. It’s the new X-factor, and it means Andy and Ben have won the game in straight sets thanks to a couple of telegenic faces, wide grins, an easy-going manner and relatable ethos (Milbourne’s motto: “Cook like you don’t have to clean”).

Conveniently perched on the demographic cusp of Gen X and Y – they’re aged 28 and 34 respectively – Allen and Milbourne’s lives were changed in classic clichéd MasterChef style when Allen won the fourth series, in which Milbourne also appeared. Their friendship cemented during filming, they’re among the vanguard of homegrown TV food stars who came of age professionally in an era in which food has become a cross-cultural medium of mass entertainment.

Not that the MasterChef connection is a particularly crucial one four years after the event. Allen is now a part of NSW’s Three Blue Ducks tribe and a co-owner of their Roseberry restaurant; Milbourne runs a cooking school in his native Tasmania and has produced two cookbooks.

As Milbourne concedes, “MasterChef – that’s the parent that gave birth to us but this approach we’re taking now, where it’s not all polished reshoots, is worlds apart.”

The Food Network’s first foray into first-run local content, Andy & Ben Eat Australia loosely follows the format of Andy and Ben Eat the World, in which they travelled through Spain, Mexico and Portugal chasing the elusive notion of the perfect dish, visiting markets and chefs along the way and doing the odd cook-up. It sounds similar in form, but they insist it’s worlds apart in execution.

“As much as we loved doing that, we thought it was time to come home and do something in our backyard,” says Allen. “It’s so much easier to get shit done if you can speak the language. You can have as many fixers as you want but overseas it’s a tough game. It’s much easier to travel and much easier to film here. We can come to a place like (the Queen Victoria market), pick up some ingredients, stop on the side of the road and do an amazing cook whereas you just can’t do it there.”

So how do you stay ahead of the crowded food TV pack? That’s where the freewheeling nature of the show comes into it. There are strictly no reshoots, which not only keeps the budget and shooting time down, but adds to the invaluable sense of authenticity. “The more we work the more we find this is the way we want to do it,” says Allen, “because this is a real experience. Not saying other shows aren’t real experiences but this is as real as it gets.”

It’s one that’s not without its share of headaches. There’s a tense moment waiting to see if the South American pan-pipe band will finish their busking set before the boys arrive for their doughnut stop, but all bloopers are dealt with in their typically insouciant fashion.

“The advance team go ahead and make sure the space is okay, the lighting is okay. They will feed that back to the camera guys and we just get told to go, so we go and capture the real experience. If there’s not enough to edit then we just have to deal with it,” says Milbourne.

“This show … mistakes are shown. The walls are broken now in entertainment and that’s what we’re trying to show. The food genre is too polished and we’re trying to show the looseness.”

“Because this is a real experience. Not saying other shows aren’t real experiences but this is as real as it gets.”

An Australia-wide journey, Andy and Ben Eat Australia features a number of episodes in each state, involving a visit to a leading restaurant in each capital city (in Hobart it was Franklin; in Melbourne, Coda, and in Adelaide, Africola) and producers, markets and chef identities thrown in for good measure. On that count, Andy and Ben are happy they’ve been accepted by the cheffing fraternity despite their made-for-TV origins.

“We have our own careers going on in the industry now,” says Allen. “The chefs and producers we talk to know that we’re in it for the love of food and for the industry. They know we’re not just doing it for the fame or to be TV presenters. Really, we’re anything but TV presenters.”

Andy and Ben Eat Australia premieres Wednesday 15 February, 9:30pm, on Food Network.

Salmonella poisoning: what is it and how can you avoid it?



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SAINSBURY’S has recalled seven of its stir fry packet products because they might contain salmonella.

Staff will refund customers if they bring in Sainsbury’s Oriental Style Vegetable Stir Fry, Sainsbury’s Mushroom Stir Fry, Sainsbury’s Beansprouts, Sainsbury’s Mixed Pepper Stir Fry, Sainsbury’s Basics Stir Fry, Sainsbury’s Hot & Spicy Stir Fry and Sainsbury’s Sweet & Crunchy Stir Fry with use-by dates up to and including February 13.

READ MORE: Sainsbury’s are recalling stir fry vegetable packets over salmonella risk

But how do you know if you might have salmonella poisoning and what can you do about it?

Sainsbury’s at Swansea Marina.

SALMONELLA FACT FILE

What are the symptoms of salmonella poisoning and how long do they last?

Diarrhoea, stomach cramps and sometimes vomiting and fever.

On average, it takes from 12 hours to three days for the symptoms to develop. They usually last for four to seven days and most people recover without treatment.

But if you become seriously ill, you may need hospital care because the dehydration caused by the illness can be life-threatening.

How do you get infected with salmonella?

You usually get salmonella by eating contaminated food. Salmonella bacteria live in the gut of many farm animals and can affect meat, eggs, poultry and milk.

Other foods like green vegetables, fruit and shellfish can become contaminated through contact with manure in the soil or sewage in the water. Contamination is also possible if raw and cooked foods are stored together.

It is impossible to tell from its appearance whether food is contaminated with salmonella. It will look, smell and taste normal.

Salmonella can be spread from person to person by poor hygiene, by failing to wash your hands properly after going to the toilet, or after handling contaminated food.

How can you avoid getting infected with salmonella?

Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water: before preparing and eating food, after handling raw food, after going to the toilet or changing a baby’s nappy, after contact with pets and other animals — especially reptiles and amphibians.

Also keep cooked food away from raw food, wash raw fruits and vegetables thoroughly before eating and cook food thoroughly, especially meat, so that it is piping hot.

And keep all kitchen surfaces and equipment including knives, chopping boards and dish cloths clean.

Wash vegetables like courgettes before cooking them.

What to do if someone has salmonella?

Wash all dirty clothes, bedding and towels in the washing machine on the hottest cycle possible.

Clean toilet seats, toilet bowls, flush handles, taps and wash hand basins after use with detergent and hot water, followed by a household disinfectant.

How do you treat salmonella?

Drink plenty of fluids as diarrhoea or vomiting can lead to dehydration and you can lose important sugars and minerals from your body. Your doctor may recommend a rehydration solution, available from your pharmacist.

Sometimes severe cases are treated with antibiotics.

DR. WATTS: Should I feed my pet a raw meat diet? | Culpeper Living

Q: My breeder recommended feeding my new puppy raw meat? Isn’t that dangerous?

A: Yes, it can be—both to your pets and your family. Fortunately, this fad seems to be dying out. Several years ago, our practice treated pets sickened by raw diets much more frequently than today. Perhaps contributing to this decline was a policy statement adopted by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) nearly five years ago. The statement reads:

“The AVMA discourages the feeding to cats and dogs of any animal-source protein that has not first been subjected to a process to eliminate pathogens because of the risk of illness to cats and dogs as well as humans. Cooking or pasteurization through the application of heat until the protein reaches an internal temperature adequate to destroy pathogenic organisms has been the traditional method used to eliminate pathogens in animal-source protein, although the AVMA recognizes that newer technologies and other methods such as irradiation are constantly being developed and implemented.

Animal-source proteins of concern include beef, pork, poultry, fish and other meat from domesticated or wild animals as well as milkand eggs. Several studies reported in peer-reviewed scientific journals have demonstrated that raw or undercooked animal-source protein may be contaminated with a variety of pathogenic organisms, including Salmonella spp, Campylobacter spp, Clostridium spp, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus.

Cats and dogs may develop foodborne illness after being fed animal-source protein contaminated with these organisms if adequate steps are not taken to eliminate pathogens; secondary transmission of these pathogens to humans (eg, pet owners) has also been reported. Cats and dogs can develop subclinical infections with these organisms but still pose a risk to livestock, other nonhuman animals, and humans, especially children, older persons and immunocompromised individuals.

To mitigate public health risks associated with feeding inadequately treated animal-source protein to cats and dogs, the AVMA recommends the following:

» Avoid feeding inadequately treated animal-source protein to cats and dogs

» Restrict cats’ and dogs’ access to carrion and animal carcasses (eg, while hunting)

» Provide fresh, clean, nutritionally balanced and complete commercially prepared or home-cooked food to cats and dogs, and dispose of uneaten food at least daily

» Practice personal hygiene (eg, handwashing) before and after feeding cats and dogs, providing treats, cleaning pet dishes, and disposing of uneaten food

The recommendation not to feed unpasteurized milk to animals does not preclude the feeding of unpasteurized same-species milk to unweaned juvenile animals.”

While some have called the policy statement “controversial,” it should be noted that more than 90 percent of the AVMA delegates voted in favor of this policy. That’s a pretty unified and decisive voice. The policy was considered by a diverse group of doctors representing a wide cross-section of the veterinary profession.

The AVMA House of Delegates includes veterinarians representing all fifty states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. It also includes representatives from the American Animal Hospital Association, National Association of Federal Veterinarians, American Association of Food Hygiene Veterinarians, American Association of Veterinary Clinicians, Uniformed Services Veterinarians, American Association of Corporate and Public Practice Veterinarians, Society for Theriogenology, Association of Avian Veterinarians, American Association of Avian Pathologists, American Association of Bovine Practitioners, American Association of Equine Practitioners, American Association of Feline Practitioners, American Association of Small Ruminant Practitioners, Association of Swine Veterinarians, American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners, and veterinary students. That’s a diverse body of experts to come to 90 percent agreement on anything! Talk about “settled science.”

This group adds their well-educated voice to that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They had already issued the following warning to pet owners: “FDA does not believe raw meat foods for animals are consistent with the goal of protecting the public from significant health risks, particularly when such products are brought into the home and/or used to feed domestic pets.”

Please fully consider the dangers to both the four-legged and two-legged members of your family when contemplating the use of a raw diet for your pets. Veterinarians take an oath to protect the health of both animals and people. Your family veterinarian is your best resource for guidance on the ideal food for your pets. Make an appointment today to discuss the care and feeding of your new puppy. His health—and maybe yours—depends on it!

Dr. Watts is a companion animal general practitioner and owner of Clevengers Corner Veterinary Care. He can be reached at 540/428-1000.