Luzerne County restaurant inspections, April 26 to May 3

The following are recent Luzerne County restaurant inspection reports from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture. According to the agency: “any inspection is a ‘snapshot’ of the day and time of the inspection. An inspection conducted on any given day may not be representative of the overall, long-term cleanliness of an establishment. Also, at the time of the inspection, violations are recorded but are often corrected on site prior to the inspector leaving the establishment.” The information is taken from the inspection database at www.eatsafepa.com. Postal addresses used here are as listed on the state’s website, and may not correspond to the municipalities in which facilities are physically located.

Bistro on the Ave, 174 United Penn Plaza, Kingston: regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Observed containerized food stored directly on the floor in walk-in cooler, rather than six inches off of the floor as required. The food was elevated during this inspection.

CFM Beer Store, 101 Main St., Luzerne: regular inspection; in compliance.

Cherone’s Surf Club, 625 Ridge St., Freeland: regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Lights are not shielded or shatter proof over the food prep areas.

Convenient Food Mart No. 3014, 101 Main St., Luzerne: regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Receiving door located in the rear of the facility a gap with visible light at the floor door junction, and does not protect against the entry of insects, rodents, and other animals.

Danko’s Restaurant, 827 South St., Freeland: regular inspection; in compliance.

Huntsville Golf Club, 1334 Market St., Lehman: regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: The exit door located near the food service office has a gap (with visible light) at the floor door junction and does not protect against the entry of insects, rodents, and other animals. Observed containerized food stored directly on the floor in Walk-in freezer area, rather than six inches off of the floor as required. The containers were elevated during this inspection. Food facility has an original certificate posted, but the location is not conspicuous for public viewing. The certificate was placed in public view during this inspection.

La Casita Caribena, 264 E. End Center, Wilkes-Barre: regular inspection; out of compliance. Violations: An open employee’s beverage container was observed in a food preparation area. Food employees eating in prep area as evidenced by observed partially consumed food on prep table. Observed wooden mortar and pestle to be chipped and flaking and no longer easily cleaned. Observed multiple cans of insecticides in the kitchen area, not labeled by the manufacturer as approved for use in a food facility. Cans were discarded. Raw chicken and eggs were stored above ready-to-eat foods in the reach-in cooler. Chicken was moved. Discussed proper storage and provided guidance document. Multiple bulk ingredient storage containers not labeled with the common name of the contents. Containers were labeled. Observed plastic containers with no handles being used as scoops and stored in bulk ingredients. Containers were removed. Observed a broken handle causing a sharp edge on one reach in refriergtaion unit.

Nucleus Raw Foods LLC, 63 Main St., Luzerne: regular inspection; in compliance. Non-food contact surfaces (top outside surface of the dish machine, the floor surface of the reach in freezer in the back room) not cleaned at a frequency to preclude the accumulation of crumbs and/or dried food residue.

Osaka, 244 Adams Ave., Scranton: regular inspection; in compliance.

Pearl @ Mohegan Sun, 1280 Highway 315, Wilkes-Barre: regular inspection; in compliance.

Sabatelles Market, 114 S. Main St., Pittston: follow-up inspection; in compliance.

Turkey Hill Minit Market No. 165, 980 Wyoming Ave., Exeter: change-of-owner inspection; in compliance. Violations: Paper towel dispenser empty at the handwash sink. Papertowels were provided. Observed a build up of debris under shelves in the storage area. Observed a build up of syrup residue on the surface alongside the ice dispensing area on the self serve beverage machine. Observed a slimy build up in the drains on the self serve beverage machines. Observed a build up of residue on the back edge of the ice chute on the self serve beverage machine. Person in charge cleaned chute during inspection. Observed old dairy spillage on a carton of eggs in the walk in cooler.

Turkey Hill Minit Market No. 250, 800 N. Alter St., Hazleton: change-of-owner inspection; in compliance. Violation: Several assorted size containers of assorted milks offered for retail sale have expired sell by dates. Items removed from sale.

Austie’s Restaurant, 2333 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township: regular inspection; in compliance.

Curry Donuts, 2308 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township: regular inspection; in compliance.

Gerrity’s Market, 2280 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township: regular inspection; in compliance.

Fast Lane, 2345 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township: regular inspection; in compliance.

Kmart No. 3268, 910 Wilkes-Barre Township, Wilkes-Barre: regular inspection; in compliance. Violation: Observed pet food spillage under shelves in the sales area. Spillage was cleaned during this inspection.

Napoli Pizzeria Restaurant, 26 S. Main St., Pittston: regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed the plastic coating on the shelves in one refrigeration beginning to deteriorate. Observed a build-up of food residue on the underside and egde of shelves in the walk in cooler.

New Yong Hao Buffet, 252 Susquehanna Blvd., Hazleton: regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Food containers stored on floor in walk in boxes. Seam between stainless steel panels behind cookline is exhibiting an open gap of approximately 1/2”. Rear food prep screen doors are not tight fitting to frames. Thermometers for ensuring proper temperatures of food are not available or readily accessible.

Polish American Citizen’s Club, 111 Elm St., Dupont: regular inspection; in compliance.

Sleepy Hollow Golf Center, 1303 Sant Johns Rd., Drums: regular inspection; in compliance.

Subway No. 32079, 286 S. River St., Plains: regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed a build up of slimy residue on the back of the ice chute handle on the self serve beverage machine. Observed food residue on the underside and edge of the shelf in the walk in cooler. Observed food residue in along crevices on one vegetable slicer. An open employee’s beverage container was observed in back prep area.

Tomato Bar, 7 Tomato Fest Dr., Pittston: regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed a build up of residue on the lemon press in the bar area. Press was cleaned. Food ingredient storage containers, in the bar area, were not labeled with the common name of the food. Containers were labeled. Observed a build up of sticky residue on the liquor storage shelf in the bar area. Observed a build up of food residue along the back edge and around the hinges on the Bain Marie. Observed a build up of residue on the underside and edges of shlves in the walk in cooler. Observed old sticker residue on the exterior of some food pans.

Turkey Hill Mini Market No. 270, 2 N. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top: change of owner inspection; in compliance.

Turkey Hill Mini Market No. 249, 7 Airport Road, Hazle Township: change of owner inspection; in compliance.

Valley-Hi Food Drive In, 1 Susquehanna Blvd., West Hazleton: regular inspection; in compliance.

Ben & George’s, 194 Oak St., Pittston: regular inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed rusting shelves in the reach in freezer. Observed too numerous to count rodent-like droppings under shelving and behind equipment. Person in charge cleaned affected areas during this inspection.

Callahan’s Cage & Coffee House, 69 S. Main St., Pittston: regular inspection; in compliance.

Elko’s Lanes, 334 Main St., Dupont: regular inspection; in compliance.

Leggio’s Pizza & Italian Restaurant, 1092 Route 315, Wilkes-Barre: follow-up inspection; in compliance. Violations: Observed a build up of food residues in the cracks and corners of the Bain Marie. Observed a build up of dust on the fan guard in the walk in cooler. Observed 20 dead ant-like insects on the floor under shelves in the storage area. Person in charge cleaned affected areas.

McGinty’s, 1557 Dickson Ave., Scranton: regular inspection; in compliance.

Pittston Beer and Deli Inc./Chester Chicken, 325 Laurel Rd., Pittston: follow-up inspection; in compliance.

Shandra’s Pizza, 424 S. Main St., Pittston: regular inspection; in compliance.

Study looks for dogs with CIL disease; ways to return song to a canary | Pets

I would like to bring some attention to a terrible disease that strikes all breeds of dogs, but rarely gets any publicity — Canine Intestinal Lymphangiectasis, which is an intestinal disease, causing diarrhea, swelling and malabsorption.

I had never heard of it before my 8-year-old bulldog Daisy was diagnosed through an ultrasound and biopsy. She died six months later despite a low-fat diet, lots of medication and several rounds of plasma. There seems to be no set protocol for treating this disease, and every dog is different as far as their reaction.

The CIL Education Group on Facebook has 685 members, and I highly recommend them to anyone dealing with this disease as they have lots of good information and offer tremendous support. While some dogs can be maintained for years on a special diet and medication, many die within months of being diagnosed like my Daisy, and it is a helpless feeling.

I would appreciate your thoughts on CIL and like to know why there isn’t more research being done so that a cure can be found? — Carol, Las Vegas, NV

Your letter is timely. Dr. Kenneth Simpson, Professor of Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University, is currently conducting research on Canine Intestinal Lymphangiectasis (CIL) in Yorkshire terriers. The research is sponsored by the American Kennel Club and the Yorkshire Terrier Health Foundation. Simpson says their goal is “to determine the underlying genetic basis of a breed-specific protein-losing enteropathy that is characterized by lymphangiectasis and ‘crypt cysts.’ “

In other words, they are researching the genetic basis for CIL in the hopes of designing a genetic marker-based test that can prevent the breeding of dogs with this condition in the future.

CIL is a rare canine disorder in which the lymph cells dilate and cannot contain their fluid, which results in protein loss, diarrhea and malabsorption. Fluid leakage can extend into the abdomen and fill the chest wall, making breathing difficult, says Simpson. Other symptoms can include seizures, tremors and shaking, but these also mimic other diseases. Diagnosis is made by physical exam, blood test, and ultra sound and biopsy of the intestine.

The three breeds that are most susceptible to this disease are Yorkshire terriers, soft-coated wheaten terriers, and the Lundehund. But, as we learn from your bulldog Daisy, any dog can get CIL. While many dogs respond to fat-restricted diets and anti-inflammatory medications, says Simpson, there is no cure and a 50 percent fatality rate in the first year.

To conduct the research, Cornell University needs 300 blood samples from Yorkshire terriers diagnosed with CIL. They won’t provide individual results, but the contribution may lead to the creation of the genetic test. To anyone interested, send an email to [email protected] with the subject line “CIL Blood Samples for Study” for more information.

My 7-year-old white canary hasn’t sung in over a year. It used to be beautiful. I’ve not made any significant changes to his routine. His diet is the same, a combination of commercial canary bird seed, long seed, egg treats and fresh greens and fruit. I play two different CDs of canary songs, and the most this elicits is a note or two. I hope you can provide me with a few hints to restore his song. — Kevin, Bethpage, NY

Health is always the first concern, but I am going to assume an avian veterinarian has examined your canary and told you there are no apparent health issues.

My next question is, could your canary be a female? Some females sing when they are young but stop after their first molt. These same hens then sing sporadically after that, but never with the consistency of males.

Next, look at his cage. He should live in a medium-sized cage (not too small, not too big) with plenty of perches to exercise throughout the day. He should be in a quiet location, free of drafts and with lots of natural sunlight, which is essential in keeping these songbirds from getting depressed.

Add a few more vegetables and fruits to your canary’s diet, like raw dandelion greens, raw collard greens, broccoli, apples, bananas, oranges, pears, peaches and cherries. If he does sing, even just a little, give him some fruit to mark the behavior and reinforce the habit.

Finally, keep your bird’s nails clipped. Sometimes, if the nails get too long and uncomfortable, a canary will stop singing.

Let me know if any of these suggestions helps re-engage your bird in song again.

Cathy M. Rosenthal is a longtime animal advocate, author, columnist and pet expert who has more than 25 years in the animal welfare field. Send your pet questions, stories and tips to [email protected]. Please include your name, city, and state. You can follow her @cathymrosenthal.

Lehigh Valley restaurant inspections: April 22-28

Here are the results of food safety inspections in Lehigh and Northampton counties for the week of April 22-28.

The inspections listed here are those that fall under the jurisdiction of the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, as well as those county and local health departments that have elected to post results in the department’s statewide inspection database.

The inspections cover restaurants, cafeterias, food markets, processors and other food establishments. To read full reports on each inspection, visit https://www.pafoodsafety.pa.gov/Web/Inspection/PublicInspectionSearch.aspx

The violations listed here are those that are classified as “Foodborne Illness Risk Factors and Public Health Interventions,” which can result in illness if not corrected. There are other violations not listed here that are classified under “Good Retail Practices.” Visit the link above to see the full list of violations among all categories.

Disclaimer: According to the Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Laboratory Services division, “inspections are a ‘snapshot’ of the day and time of the inspection. Also, at the time of the inspection, violations are recorded but are often corrected on the spot prior to the inspector leaving the facility.” For more information on how the inspections are conducted, view a list of FAQs.

LEHIGH COUNTY

Top Diner

1019 UNION BLVD Allentown, PA 18109

Date: 4/26/18

Inspection Type: Regular

Compliance: In

Violation(s): 2

Inspector Comments:

-Observed in the upstairs walk in refrigerator, that raw ground beef was stored above prepared jell-o. Any type of raw animal meat must never be stored above any ready to eat food product is to set up specific shelves for the storage of various food products. See food storage hierarchy information.

-In the upstairs walk in refrigerator, food that was prepared was placed into the refrigerator without any type of date markings as to when the food was prepared and the use by date. ALL foods are to be marked with the above listed information.

MSB Inc

1227 AIRPORT RD Allentown, PA 18109

Date: 4/24/18

Inspection Type: Regular

Compliance: In

Violation(s): 1

Inspector Comments:

-The hot hold cabinet near the register was holding food that was not 135 degrees. The food was recently made. The food was taken out of the wrap, and brought up to temperature in a microwave. Food was returned to the cabinet, and the temperature control for the unit was increased to provide a hotter temperature for hot holding.

Redners Quick Shoppe

1135 AIRPORT RD Allentown, PA 18109

Date: 4/24/18

Inspection Type: Regular

Compliance: In

Violation(s): 1

Inspector Comments:

-Observed that the units that dispense products(creamer machine, coca machine, and the soda dispenser< have films and food debris built up on the nozzles. The nozzle on all of these units are to be taken off, washed, rinsed, and sanitized. They are to be with an increased frequency in the future.

1-Stop Lehigh Mart

1240 LEHIGH ST Allentown, PA 18103

Date: 4/23/18

Inspection Type: Regular

Compliance: In

Violation(s): 2

Inspector Comments:

-Paper towel dispenser is empty at the handwash sinks in the bathroom and at the 3 bay sink. Supply hand wash sinks at all times with paper towel.

-Soap was not available at the handwash sink located next to the 3 bay dish sink.

Happy Sandwich

123 S 7TH ST Allentown, PA 18101

Date: 4/23/18

Inspection Type: Regular

Compliance: Out

Violation(s): 3

Inspector Comments:

-Old food residue and a dish was observed in the handwash sink, indicating uses other than hand washing. Hand wash sinks can only be used for hand washing.

-Potentially hazardous ready-to-eat food prepared in the food facility and held for more than 48 hours, is not being date marked. Potentially hazardous ready-to-eat food prepared in the food facility and held for more than 48 hours must be date marked for six days from the date of preparation, totaling seven days. The product must be discarded or sold after that date.

-Raw fish was observed being stored over cooked rice. Store all raw meat and fish below or separate from cooked and ready-to-eat foods.

La Casa del Chimi II

147 N 7TH ST Allentown, PA 18102

Date: 4/23/18

Inspection Type: Regular

Compliance: Out

Violation(s): 6

Inspector Comments:

-The Person in Charge does not have adequate knowledge of food safety in this food facility as evidenced by this non-compliant inspection.

-Raw ground beef was stored next to cut tomatoes that were being used on sandwiches in the bain marie. Separate raw animal proteins from ready to eat foods such as sliced tomatoes. Tomatoes were discarded, product was moved.

-Cut squash stored open in the produce storage area open with no covering. Once cut, produce must be covered to prevent contamination.

-Observed rice and potatoes stored directly on the floor in produce storage area, rather than 6 inches off of the floor as required. All food must be stored at least 6 inches off the floor as required.

-Several products, including tripe, pork, and chicken were held at temperatures of 107, 98, & 85F. All hot held product must be held above 135F. Product was out of temperature less than 4hrs and was promptly reheated to above 165F.

-Chicken, which was cooled, was only reheated to 85°F for hot holding and not 165°F for 15 seconds as required. When reheating, food must reach a temperature of 165F for at least 15 seconds. Food was reheated in the oven to above 165F.

Linden Mini Market

100 N 2ND ST Allentown, PA 18101

Date: 4/23/18

Inspection Type: Regular

Compliance: In

Violation(s): 1

Inspector Comments:

-Baby food and baby formula on shelf for sale well past expiration date. Do not sell expired baby formula or food.

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY

Villa Grande Pizzeria

225 W Northampton ST Bath, PA 18014

Date: 4/23/18

Inspection Type: Complaint

Compliance: Out

Violation(s): 3

Inspector Comments:

-Deli slicer, a food contact surface, was observed to have food residue and was not clean to sight and touch. Facility agreed to break unit down and clean it prior to reuse. Observed knives and a pen stored in a container on cookline with old food debris- Corrected on site by pulling container and items and cleaning.

-Raw beef was stored above ready to eat foods in the merch cooler in the kitchen area. Corrected on site by relocating. Par-cooked chicken in the rear storage room flip top freezer stored open with no covering.

-No handwash sink conveniently located in the kitchen. Facility was notified this must be provided. A staging sink with dishes etc, will be used as a temporary handwash sink until one has been installed. During this period of time the sink may be used only for handwash. No papertowels located at handwash sink.

Source: Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture Food Safety Inspection database

Raw Pet Food Poses Health Risks for Dogs and Pet Owners, According to Veterinarian

Some pet owners opt to feed their pets raw food diets under the belief that this will boost the pet’s energy and enhance the nutrients available, as certain nutrients die when exposed to heat. The raw diet can be packaged, or home-cooked. However, veterinarians say raw meat can contain bacteria including E.coli, Salmonella and Listeria, all of which can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, and lethargy.

“Even raw pet food that you buy commercially prepared in a pet store is still potentially dangerous because it can still contain harmful bacteria,” Julia Calderone, Consumer Reports’ health editor told CTV News. “The harmful bacteria in raw pet food is not only potentially dangerous for your pet but it could be harmful for anyone in the home, too.”

While there is often a stigma surrounding the safety aspect of feeding dogs a vegan diet, albeit raw or cooked, it is safe to feed dogs a plant-based diet. Many dogs even thrive when fed nourishing vegan foods as edible plants are undesirable substance-free. The UK’s best-selling vegan dog food brand, Benevo Vegan Pet Foods, that retail across the globe recently received a high accolade: The Queen’s Award for Enterprise for International Trade.

Also, just last week U.S.-based vegan dog food company, V-Dog, announced its international expansion following a partnership with sister company V-Planet. Pooches in the U.S. have been able to get their paws on the products for 13 years, but the new move marks a big step for the popular dog food brand.

V-Planet’s vice president, Lindsay Rubin, explained the benefits of feeding dogs a plant-based diet: “In addition to offering health benefits such as improved skin and coat conditions and relief from food allergies, vegan diets for dogs eliminate animal suffering while drastically reducing environmental impact.”

Last year, a research paper suggested that cats and dogs in the U.S. produce the equivalent of 64 million tons of carbon dioxide each year; this number in itself is a motivating factor for many environmentally-conscious dog owners to opt for a plant-based product due to the diet’s lower greenhouse gas emissions and carbon footprint and therefore, sustainability.


Comments

U.S. and Canada Investigate Norovirus Outbreak from Raw Oysters

Raw Food Diet User Review, Results and Health Risks

Sushi, ceviches, and carpaccios are fashionable and certain natural food currents, such as crudivorism or instinctoterapy, affirm that raw foods are more nutritious and therefore healthier. However, many of them raise the risk of intoxication if certain precautions are not taken.

The raw food diet often called rawfoodian “raw” or raw veganism consists of raw and unprocessed foods mostly or in full.

A food is considered raw if it has never been heated above 104-118 ° F (40-48 ° C). Nor should it be refined, pasteurized, treated with pesticides or processed in any other way.

In contrast, the diet allows for several alternative methods of preparation, such as juice, mixing, dehydration, soaking, and germination.

As in veganism, the raw food diet is usually plant-based and consists mainly of fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds.

Although most raw food diets are completely plant-based, some people also consume raw eggs and dairy products. Even less frequently, raw fish and meat are included.

On the other hand, the intake of supplements is ruled out. Advocates often claim that the diet provides all the nutrients the body needs.

Benefits

The main benefits of this diet are that by consuming a high amount of fruits and vegetables, we are getting a high consumption of fiber and nutrients important to our body, which in other types of diets is not easy to cover. In addition to being limited in terms of variety of foods, look for different recipes and preparations to not get bored.

This type of diet is usually very effective in weight control since the type of food that can be used is low caloric intake and all junk and industrialized products must be eliminated, which are the ones that produce anxiety.

Among the benefits of the raw diet should be noted that it covers the recommendations of vitamins, minerals, and fiber; it is also a source of antioxidants and phytonutrients, which are the nutrients derived from vegetables, protects against colon cancer and preserves vitamin C since the cooking processes do not destroy it.

At the same time, this diet has received several criticisms for different reasons. One of them is that consuming a lot of fiber can be counterproductive and trigger adverse effects such as inflammation and calcium deficiency.

On the other hand, there are foods that are better absorbed if they are cooked and causes a deficiency of vitamin B12, calcium, iron, and proteins, which implies that supplements should be taken.

Risks in the consumption of raw foods

Apart from food contamination by microorganisms or other chemical or physical substances, there are natural toxins, antinutritional factors, in foods that are eliminated by cooking. If the raw food is taken, it can cause harm to health. These toxic substances act by interfering with metabolic processes and the bioavailability of nutrients as in the case of antivitamin, enzyme inhibitors, anti-mineral and polyvalent antinutrients.

In most cases where raw food is consumed, the security measures are summarized in two basic tips: to obtain a product that is trustworthy at its source, which must also be very fresh; and extreme hygiene measures in terms of conservation and handling.

DSNY’s Foundation for New York’s Strongest Names Program Awardees

The New York City Department of Sanitation’s (DSNY) Foundation for New York’s Strongest has announced the winners of its inaugural Microgrant Program, which helps small businesses either begin or expand their food waste reduction efforts. The awardees will receive $2,000 and technical assistance from leading experts in the field for projects ranging from implementing compost systems to creating zero waste event stations. The projects will be funded via proceeds from the foundation’s successful Food Waste Fair last year.

“Given the more than 650,000 tons of food scraps New York businesses produce annually, these kinds of efforts have never been more important,” said Elizabeth Balkan, executive director of the Foundation for New York’s Strongest and director of policy at DSNY, in a statement. “The Microgrants provide city businesses extra support as they transition to more sustainable operations. Additionally, these partners will help us develop and demonstrate best management practices to the larger business community in the city and the nation.”

The awardees include:

1. Ox Verte: A plant-forward food company working to reinvent office lunch and breakfast, making seasonally fresh, locally sourced food an everyday occurrence and offering wholesome meals that can nourish bodies and nurture the communities it serves.

Ox Verte has encountered challenges in full product utilization due to fluctuations in client order volumes and desired lead times, the limited accuracy of forecasting tools and minimum purchase requirements. Ox Verte will be using its grant to purchase a commercial freezer to best use raw food at a later date. Increasing the cold storage capacity at Ox Verte will reduce the amount of food discarded or diverted for compost, reducing the business’ footprint and potentially allowing Ox Verte to glean additional insights into strategic procurement.

“As a company with a triple-bottom line, Ox Verte is committed to making a positive impact on various stakeholders, including the planet. Reducing food waste in our kitchen is one important way we can protect and preserve the planet,” said Jessie Gould, Ox Verte founder, in a statement.

2. RoHo Compost: A food waste diversion and education nonprofit providing services to businesses in the New York City area. These services include hauling organic waste to compost facilities and transporting surplus food to food pantries.

RoHo Compost will be using its grant to design and install zero waste stations throughout the event grounds of Smorgasburg’s Williamsburg and Prospect Park sites. The zero waste stations will include a sorting platform to remove contamination from the market’s organic waste stream, education stations for outreach to the public at the markets and coordination of volunteers to spearhead interactive educational programs at the markets.

“RoHo Compost’s mission is to divert food waste from landfills, through composting and food recovery programs. We collaborate with Brooklyn Flea’s Smorgasburg markets to divert their food and organic waste through composting,” said Marc de Konkoly Thege, founder of Roho Compost, in a statement. “With the foundation’s funds, we are implementing zero waste stations at the Smorgasburg markets to educate the public on our joint effort to divert food waste and increase diversion rates of what is composted, recycled and sent to the landfill.”

3. Trans Am Café: A local vegetarian/vegan community-based cafe on the border between Bushwick and Ridgewood.

Trans Am Cafe will be using its grant to install a three-bin compost system and a storage site for processing compost onsite. Once built and in operation, it will look into selling the compost it produces.

“Trans Am Cafe is a local cafe seeking to serve its community, and it’s a collaborative creative space for connecting the neighborhood and serving fresh food and drinks,” said Bradford Still, owner of Trans Am Café, in a statement. “We provide healthy vegetarian and vegan options, as well as locally roasted coffee. The cafe seeks to reduce waste as much as possible and is excited to be working with Hila Perry on creating an educational environment surrounding compost and gardening. By having a composting facility in our backyard, we can turn what was once waste into high value product for our gardens and our community.”

4. White Moustache is dedicated to making handmade yogurt. Using the leftover whey from its yogurt-making process, it has created a variety of probiotic tonics and ice pops in addition to its yogurt line. U.S. yogurt manufacturers dispose of more than 150 million gallons of whey every year, and White Moustache is finding tasty and impactful uses for it. Six flavors of its Probiotic Pops debuted at the foundation’s Food Waste Fair preview event last June.

White Moustache has found that serving and selling its Probiotic Pops is a twofold challenge: First, engaging consumers on the subject of yogurt whey, and second, finding an effective way to keep the pops frozen at large and outdoor events. White Moustache will be using its grant to purchase a customized, branded freezer cart that will serve as a mobile vending and marketing unit for its Probiotic Pops. The cart will enable the company to expand its market presence and educate the public about the impact their purchases have at reducing food waste.

“Up to now, there has been no demand for the millions of gallons of yogurt whey produced in this country, so most companies treat it as waste. White Moustache is striving to show the world that yogurt whey is a nutritious, delicious ingredient that tastes creamy and lightly tangy and is full of probiotics, just like our yogurt,” said Homa Dashtaki, founder of White Moustache, in a statement. We are proud and excited to introduce the world to yogurt whey through our Probiotic Pops. Thanks to our foundation grant, we will be buying a freezer cart so we can serve refreshing, fruity Probiotic Pops all around NYC this summer.”

The New York State Pollution Prevention Institute is the foundation’s technical advisory partner for the Microgrant Program and served on the Microgrant Advisory Committee. The institute will offer technical brief assistance to the grant awardees, including creating a tracking mechanism for recording food waste, advising on how to efficiently sort waste onsite, assessing the environmental benefits of food waste prevention and sharing best practices. The institute will also hold regular check-in calls with the grantees and conduct site visits.

“The NYC Food Waste Fair was proof of the significant interest small food-related businesses have in reducing food waste in their operations, and the Microgrant Program picks up where it left off,” said DSNY Commissioner Kathryn Garcia in a statement. “We are seeing tremendous, innovative solutions for food waste emerging in New York City and beyond, which can save businesses money and improve their operations. I am pleased to see the Foundation for New York’s Strongest Microgrant program helping small, local businesses implement food waste reduction strategies and witness the steps all New Yorkers are taking to reach zero landfill waste by 2030.”

Pet owners warned against dangers of raw food

Pet owners are being warned against the dangers of feeding their animals raw food.

Many dog owners say the raw meat gives their animals good energy and better health.

However, veterinarians say raw food like meats can contain harmful bacteria, such as E.coli, Salmonella and Listeria.

Vancouver vet Dr. Daniela Goldman said vomiting and diarrhea are common results of these type of diets.

Experts say even raw food bought from a store can be harmful for both dogs and humans alike.

“Even raw pet food that you buy commercially prepared in a pet store is still potentially dangerous because it can still contain harmful bacteria,” explained Julia Calderone, Consumer Reports health editor.

“The harmful bacteria in raw pet food is not only potentially dangerous for your pet but it could be harmful for anyone in the home, too.”

If you do choose to feed your furry friend a raw meat diet, Consumer Reports has outlined some important precautions to take.

Make sure to use hot soapy water to clean everything the raw food has touched, as well as disinfecting with a commercial product or a bleach solution.

Use warm water and soap to wash your hands after handling raw food or playing with your pet.

Avoid kisses from your pooch, as this transmits a lot of bacteria.

With a report from CTV Vancouver’s Ross McLaughlin

A food-poisoning expert reveals 5 things he never orders at restaurants — and it’s not what you’d expect, Business Insider

Your salad may be healthy, but it probably isn't the safest option when it comes to food poisoning
caption
Your salad may be healthy, but it probably isn’t the safest option when it comes to food poisoning
source
Shutterstock
  • After more than two decades as a foodborne-illness attorney, there are some items that food poisoning expert Bill Marler will never order from the menu.
  • The foods Marler says are most dangerous aren’t always what you’d expect.
  • The food poisoning expert eats raw fish at sushi restaurants – but says there is a reason why you should consider skipping salad when going out to eat.

A deep knowledge of thousands of food poisoning cases across the US means that there are some things that Bill Marler just won’t order when he goes out to eat.

With more than two decades working as a food poisoning advocate and attorney, there are simply some things that Marler has cut out of his diet. Marler has won more than $600 million for clients in foodborne-illness cases – and seen how restaurants are being forced to change to prevent more sicknesses.

“Chain restaurants, post-Jack-in-the-Box, they went through a sort of rethinking about how they do stuff,” Marler said.

Today, many of the biggest risk for food poisoning at chain restaurants come from an individual worker who “picked his nose then made your burrito,” Marler said. The action of a rogue restaurant worker can make a handful of people sick – but usually won’t spark a huge outbreak.

However, there are some foods that Marler avoids when he goes out to eat.

Here are the foods that Marler said scare him the most on the menu:


Salads

source
Callie Ahlgrim/INSIDER

Your healthy choice is actually one of the riskier options on the menu at chain restaurants.

“I’d eat sushi before I ate a salad,” Marler said. “I wouldn’t eat it at a 7-11, but I’ve eaten sushi at a good sushi restaurant.”

While cooking veggies and meat can kill germs, salads bring together a lot of raw foods that have had countless opportunities for contamination. Restaurants that buy pre-chopped lettuce from suppliers put themselves at even greater risk.

“Not every lettuce leaf in the field is contaminated E. coli, but some of them are,” Marler said of the risks of pre-washed, bagged lettuce. “And when you mix and match it at a processing facility and chop it up, you get what you get.”


Soft-serve ice cream

source
FlipTable/Wikimedia

Cleanliness of ice and ice cream machines can cause huge problems when workers aren’t following safety guidelines. There’s a grossness factor of finding mold in soft-serve ice cream machines – but there are also real risks.

“There have been a number of cases linked to listeria, where listeria will get into the inner workings of these ice cream machines and kill people,” Marler said.


Rare meat

source
Marshall Astor – Food Fetishist via http://www.flickr.com/photos/lifeontheedge/660304947/ Creative Commons

Marler agrees with known-germaphobe President Trump on at least one thing: well-cooked meat is the way to go.

“Skip the medium hamburger and get it well done, and just add a little ketchup like the president,” he said.

According to the expert, meat needs to be cooked to 160 degrees throughout to kill bacteria that could cause E. coli or salmonella.


Buffets

source
Shuttershock

“I never eat a buffet,” Marler said. “I’ll order off the menu.”

Buffets have a heightened risk of exposure to the lines of people who might touch or sneeze on food, contaminating the dish for anyone else. Then, there is the temperature issue, as dishes are better able to host bacteria when kept at room temperature.


Food shipped internationally

In general, Marler says people can best avoid food poisoning by simply eating food handled by as few people are possible and only eating at restaurants with strict food safety practices.

While chain restaurants tend to have strict safety policies, if they serve food from suppliers that got contaminated at some point along the supply chair, there is little they can do. And, those risks are exacerbated in the cases of food that is being imported from a significant geographical distance.

“You can get Hepatitis from scallops from the Philippines, but you probably shouldn’t be eating scallops from the Philippines,” Marler said. “You can get Hepatitis A from strawberries from Egypt, but you probably shouldn’t be getting strawberries from Egypt.”

Is raw pet food right for your dog?

Sandra Hermiston and Ross McLaughlin , CTV Vancouver


Published Friday, April 27, 2018 6:00AM PDT

Sales of commercially prepared raw pet food have soared, more than tripling in the last seven years. Many people who feed their pets raw meat claim it gives them better health and more energy. But Consumer Reports says raw food can be dangerous for both the animal and their families.

Whether it’s from the meat aisle or a commercial formulation, a raw meat diet may not contain everything your pet needs, and there are safety concerns.

Public health agencies and many veterinarians, say raw food can contain bacteria like salmonella, E. coli and listeria.

“Even raw pet food that you buy commercially prepared in a pet store is still potentially dangerous because it can still contain harmful bacteria,” explained Julia Calderone, Consumer Reports health editor.

Veterinarian Dr. Daniela Goldman says symptoms to look out for in animals include vomiting and diarrhea.

If you do choose to feed your pet raw food, Consumer Reports says to take these important precautions:

  • Use hot soapy water to clean everything the raw food has touched
  • Disinfect with a commercial product or a bleach solution of one tablespoon bleach, mixed with four cups of water
  • Also, wash your hands vigorously for 20 seconds with warm water and soap after handling raw food, playing with your pet or cleaning up after it.
  • Kisses from your pet can also transmit bacteria. So avoid that as well.

Consumer Reports says before making any big changes to your pet’s diet, consult with your veterinarian to ensure your pet will be getting all the nutrition it needs and to discuss any safety issues.