Raw food and natural materials at this new Carlton North pet store – The Weekly Review

Article Feature Image

Who’s behind the counter?

Jonathan Knight had been biding his time to find the perfect location for Cleopatra’s Pet Emporium, so when a shop came up opposite a dog park, he jumped. The dog-lover named the store after his beloved Alsatian Cleopatra. Her untimely death led him to start researching healthy pet diets, products and treatments – a project that grew into a passion and culminated in the opening of his Carlton North pet shop.

  • Cleopatra’s Pet Emporium
  • 671 Rathdowne Street, Carlton North
  • Phone: 9349 4417

What’s in store?

Don’t expect to find run-of-the-mill pet products here. Sure, the shop sells dog and cat food, collars, leashes and beds, shampoos and conditioners, but almost everything is made in Australia, with an emphasis on natural materials and holistic health. The pet emporium is dotted with pet-centric homewares – ceramics, paintings, doorstops in the form of terriers and garden benches in the shape of a rather tall sausage dog – and a giant freezer with ready-made meals for your dog made of fresh meat and vegies. Just defrost and voila.

Who’s buying?

Jonathan says he gets foot traffic from the dog park and locals passing by (naturally dogs are welcome), but because the store sells raw, human-grade pet food, people come from far and wide to get it.

“We’ve got a movement happening in the raw food community that is aimed at pets,” Jonathan says.

Our pick

Black and brass dog collar, $50, brown leather dog collar, $50, both by Rogue Royalty.


Rogue Royalty dog collars from Cleopatra’s Pet Emporium Rathdowne Street, Carlton North. Photo: Jonathan Knight

 

CPR's Raw Food Restaurant Comes To Life Downtown – Haute Living

zoodles
Zoodles

There has been something of a sea change in recent years — Miami’s populace will happily go out to eat raw, healthy food and cold pressed juices as long as they are presented beautifully. That means hippies can keep their grungy markets while hipsters, yippies and even Wall Street-types flock to the next generation of health food hotspots.

Early in on this trend is “CPR” which stands for Cold-Pressed Raw. If you think of life-saving therapy when when you hear “CPR”, it’s not by accident—this food will resuscitate you. Tatiana Peisach, a young entrepreneur of 27, started the company as raw, cold pressed juice distributor. “We were focused on wholesale and we just had really good strategic partners,” she explains.

A lot of places carried the CPR juices, but Peisach felt the brand needed it’s own space. “People were drinking our juices a lot, but we weren’t creating the brand we wanted to crete and that’s why we did the retail space. It’s really given us a home”

Now they’ve got a beautiful modern restaurant downtown that serves as a destination for not just juice, but bowls, smoothies and filling salads they are calling “Naked Foods.” These are healthy, mostly raw food dishes like their famous “Zoodles,” raw zucchini noodles they serve with pesto, vegan Parmesean and cherry tomatoes.

“Everything is either wood, stainless, or cement in the store,” explains Peisach, who allows the food and juices to bring the color. Dishes like the Beet and Kale salad, Green Avocado toast on Zak the Baker bread or the Berry Zesty Pie all bring lots and lots of color.

Kale and Beet Salad
Kale and Beet Salad

Another bonus about CPR is that unlike some juice companies, a trip there won’t break the bank. “On average, a cold pressed juice is $10-$12 dollars, and we sell ours for $8.” No small difference when you consider a juice-a-day habit, which is exactly what many of her customers have after completing juice cleanses. “We’re trying to make health more accessible to our customers,” says the young entrepreneur.

Downtowners come daily with their laptops, kicking the coffee house habit for something healthier. “Going there is an experience people couldn’t have before with the brand. We are in the heart of Brickell and you have people coming to meet friends, and people coming in with their laptops and doing work and having a healthy lunch. They don’t just grab a juice and run.”

Her juice combos aren’t just there to taste good—they all do something.  “People would call and say ‘Ok, I want something for my metabolism or I’m really tired I need something thats gonna wake me up or I need something to help me focus.’ these are all specific requests I’ve had from clients,” she says, explaining that juice combinations address these needs.

Sometimes that need is cleansing. “I have cleansed thousands of people and learned from [all of] them. I realized that it was important to make it easier and simpler for people, and that’s where we are today.

RAW FOOD: Passing fad or here to stay? – Jerusalem Post Israel News

The dining room is abuzz as people peer at the food before them. It’s the first meal of a detox program at Mitzpe Alummot, a health retreat whose focus is on raw organic vegan food and juice fasting. This group includes people in good health, those looking to lose weight and those with cancer or type 2 diabetes.For many, it’s their first foray into raw food; they’re unaccustomed to the colorful salads, sprouts and gourmet-style lasagna made from zucchini, pesto, sun-dried tomato tapenade and almond “cheese.” There are murmurs of apprehension, surprise – and approval.

Read More…




7 surprising diets of some of the world's best athletes – Tech Insider

ryan lochteClive Rose/Getty ImagesMost of us think we know what it means to “eat well.” Technically, the rules are simple: You should eat a lot of vegetables and fruits; you need enough protein and carbohydrates; and you’re better off steering clear of too much sugar.

For the average person, the total caloric number will most likely be in the 2,000 calorie range.

But when you look at professional athletes, a new level of diet weirdness starts to appear. Sure, those athletes need to hit a certain calorie number, but the way they get there can vary greatly. 

Here are the surprising diets of seven elite athletes.

Raw Vegan Food Festival Planned Near Howard This Weekend – Borderstan

Raw Food Festival (Photo courtesy of Emergence Community Arts Collective)A celebration of juices, vegetable salads and other raw vegan food is set to come to a community organization’s headquarters near Howard University this weekend.

Emergence Community Arts Collective is scheduled to hold its third annual “Raw Food Festival” at 733 Euclid St. NW from 3:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday.

“The event that aims to promote raw food in the D.C. area, its health benefits, environmental advantages, its fantastic taste,” spokeswoman Margaux Delotte-Bennett said.

The festival is broken down into three sections: uncooked vegetable and fruit tastings, the benefits of a raw food diet and fitness and gardening.

The event will have five talks on the health benefits of raw food and how to properly prepare it. There’s also an Afro-Brazilian martial art demonstration from the International Capoeira Angola Foundation.

Guests can vote on their favorite juice, sweet and savory foods and enter raffles for classes and dinners prepared by chefs, who cook raw vegan dishes, too.

Tickets, which are $25 for adults and $20 for children, get attendees $15 worth of food and entrance to the talks and other activities.

Photo courtesy of Emergence Community Arts Collective

A whole festival devoted to raw food takes place Saturday – Washington Post

THURSDAY

WINE CLASS: Participants taste and learn about rosés from around the world. Part of the One Sip at a Time series. 7:15 p.m. $25. Chain Bridge Cellars, 1351 Chain Bridge Rd., McLean. 703-356-6500. chainbridgecellars.com.

WINE DINNER: In partnership with Vinifera Imports and A. Litteri, participants sample wine and then eat a three-course dinner with wine pairings. 7 p.m. $280, including tax and gratuity. Masseria, 1340 Fourth St. NE. 202-608-1330. masseria-dc.com.

SATURDAY

COOKING CLASS: Interactive class on using farmers market produce, designed for couples. 7 p.m. $150 per couple. Workhouse Arts Center, 9518 Workhouse Way, Lorton. 703-584-2900. workhousearts.org.

PIG ROAST: Roasted pig, potato salad, head cheese and more, plus live jazz. $65, including tax and gratuity. Acadiana, 901 New York Ave. NW. 202-408-8848.

RAW FOOD FESTIVAL: Attendees learn about raw foods through cooking demonstrations and lectures. 3:30-8 p.m. $20 to $25. Emergence Community Arts Collective, 733 Euclid St. NW. 202-468-5018. bit.ly/rawfoodtickets.

MONDAY

KIDS COOKING CAMP: The start of a five-day cooking program for children ages 10 to 14. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Our Young Chefs in Silver Spring; contact Sheila Crye for full address. 301-512-8631. ouryoungchefs.com/summer-cooking-camps.

MASON DIXON MASTER CHEF TOURNAMENT: Single-elimination tournament of chefs from the Baltimore-Washington area. A portion of proceeds benefits Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland. Monday and Tuesday, 6-9:45 p.m. $25. Inn at the Colonnade Baltimore Doubletree Hotel, 4 W. University Pkwy., Baltimore. masondixonmasterchef.com.

TUESDAY

CHEFS BEHIND BARS: Cocktail event benefiting No Kid Hungry and featuring chefs Yo Matsuzaki, Matt Adler, Ed Scarpone and more. 6-8 p.m. $45 in advance, $50 at the door. DNV Rooftop, 1155 14th St. NW. bit.ly/1WjGmhk.

RESERVE NOW

JULY 20

TASTE OF GREECE: Greek food, wine and music, in celebration of “The Greeks” exhibition at the National Geographic Museum. 7 p.m. $50. National Geographic, 17th and M streets NW. 202-857-7700. natgeo.org/thegreeks.

JULY 21

COOKING CLASS: Chef Mark Haskell teaches participants to cure and preserve meat and fish at home. 7-9 p.m. $49. Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. 202-549-4172. hillcenterdc.org/home/programs/2735.

JULY 24

BARBECUE BOOT CAMP: Washington Post Smoke Signals columnist Jim Shahin leads a class on charcoal and wood smoking and grilling. 11 a.m. $85. Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. hillcenterdc.org/home/programs/2822.

Kara Elder

Send event listings to [email protected] with CALENDAR in the subject line at least 14 days in advance.

International Raw Food Day: What Does a Raw Food Diet Really … – NDTV

11th July is celebrated every day as the International Raw Food Day. It is a day dedicated to spreading awareness about the benefits of raw food consumption. It also helps highlight its long term advantages for our health. The 21st century has seen a rapid increase in the trend of fast food and other processed foods that have led to the increase in obesity levels and other non-communicable diseases like cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, etc. In the wake of such trends catching up, health experts point at the emergent need to go back to the basics, to turn to nature and turn to into a raw food enthusiast.

So what exactly is raw foodism and where can we trace back its origins? The history of raw food consumption – as a dietary and health movement- can be traced back to 1830 when an American Presbyterian minister Sylvester Graham propagated the benefits of raw food diet to combat the cholera epidemic that the country was grappling with. Apparently, the Swiss would take away the credit for being amongst the first to develop raw food as a dietary health treatment. In the late 19th century, a Swiss doctor, Maximilian Bircher Benner stumbled upon the benefits of raw food diet. It was when he was suffering from jaundice that he ate a lot of raw apples and after his recovery he conducted experiments to study the effects of raw foods on human health and the immune system.

Shifting gears to the contemporary scenario now, raw food diets have been rapidly gaining popularity all across the world. From raw food movements like raw foodism and raw veganism to special raw juice camps held in places like Portugal. Raw food, simply speaking, is food that has not been cooked, processed or exposed to any kind of chemicals or food engineering. It is consumed in its rawest and freshest form, technically, it is food that is not cooked or heated above 118 degrees. The thrust of the raw food diet is the consumption of unprocessed, whole plant-based, ideally organic foods. Nutritionists suggest that a minimum of three-quarters of a person’s diet should consist of uncooked food. The higher the proportion of raw foods in our diet, the healthier we will be.

organic-food_600.jpg

Why is raw food beneficial for one’s health? Experts and researchers in the field of health and nutrition have long stood by the benefits of raw food consumption. It is believed that just a little raw food in your diet can do wonders to your health. Raw food consumption can be an ideal way to get your daily quota of five portions of fruit and vegetables. It can help you get rid of stress, energizing your mind and body. Raw foods are full of essential nutrients, enzymes, vitamins and minerals, which are usually lost when processed or cooked. Not only this, raw foods are tad low on calories, they can help you maintain healthy skin, lustrous hair, better eyesight and can also help you boost your immunity and shed weight.(More: Busted! Common myths about raw food consumption.)

 

As they say, every good thing has a flip side to it, so does the raw food diet. Experts advise to exercise a little caution while consuming raw foods. Make sure that the foods and fruits are fresh. Wash them properly and if needed boil them. Do not use foods that have been stored for a long period of time. Take notice of the slightest of change in the natural colour or smell of the food. Ensure proper storage. Maintaining hygiene is of the utmost importance.
 
In India raw food consumption has not yet picked up as a trend. There are many factors that we can point to, the most important ones are poor hygiene and our extreme weather conditions. I personally remember the instance when I had consumed sliced raw cucumber from a local shop and ended up throwing up for a couple of days. Eating raw foods from the local shops can prove to be quite a daunting experience, as you never really know what kind of water is being used, how clean the cutlery is and above all, how hygiene friendly they themselves have been while handing over that plate of fruit salad to you. It is best to buy food items and make your own salads, smoothies and chaats at home, make sure that they are cleaned and washed properly.

Having said that, whether you plan to include a little raw food in your daily intake or want to be that dauntless enthusiast to plunge headlong into a full fledged raw food diet, we can ensure that you’ll never run short of recipe ideas. One of the best things about raw food is that you can cut them, mix them together with a bit of spices and herbs and add a little glamour to the otherwise bland affair. Read ahead to explore your options, from garden fresh salads to refreshing smoothies, here is our bumper list of recipes that will make you fall in love with raw food. Forget your cola and junk and get down to some serious raw food cooking!

Beet Feta and Orange Salad
Recipe by Vicky Ratnani

Experience the freshness and rich colours adorning your plate. Beetroot, oranges and lettuce come together, bathed in yogurt dressing and topped with nuts, herbs and feta.
 

beet_600.jpg

5 Best smoothies

Blend together some of your favourite fruits along with some milk or yogurt. Sip on the goodness or raw food and energize yourself.

 

smoothies_600.jpg

Mediterranean Watermelon Salad
Recipe by Vicky Ratnani

Here is a raw food treat that is wholesome and satisfying. Some of the best hydrating raw foods come together and create a colourful melange with an addition of subtle herbs and dressing.

 

watermelonjh_600.jpg

Mixed Vegetable SaladRecipe by Niru Gupta

Here is the world’s healthiest deal for you. A medley of greens and colourful veggies tossed in tangy vinegar and pepper. Add a bit of yogurt for that creamy texture and a dash of honey for the perfectly balanced flavour.

Raw Papaya Salad
Recipe by Roopa Gulati

Grated raw papaya, tossed in chilli sauce, red chillies, peanuts and lime juice and crowned with fresh coriander

 

papayasalad_600.jpg

Green Salad With Feta
Recipe by Ritu Dalmia

Bright and fresh salad with crunchy nuts, salad greens, tomatoes, onions, lime juice and a drizzle of light dressing.

 

greenssalad_med.jpg

Sproutamin Salad
Recipe by Vicky Ratnani

Indulge in a wholesome and nourishing goodness of this super salad. Throw in all your favourite fruits and bean sprouts. From kiwis, olives, cherry tomatoes to chowli, methi and other bean sprouts. Theses are mixed together with an addition of pepper, feta cheese and olive oil dressing.

 

beansand sproutssalad_600.jpg

Aam Rass
Recipe by Niru Gupta
Sip on the nectar of on of your favourite fruit. Delighting, fresh, hydrating and energizing.

 

amras_600.jpg

Tabbouleh Salad
Recipe by Aditya Bal

It can’t get healthier than this! Bring on a healthy treat packed with daliya, mint, parsley and olives bathed in olive oil and pepper.

Apple and Celery Salad
Recipe by Aditya Bal

Fresh apples and garden fresh celery brought together with simple olive oil, honey and lime juice dressing.

 

appleandcelerysalad_600.jpg

 

International Raw Food Day: What Does a Raw Food Diet Really Mean? – NDTV

11th July is celebrated every day as the International Raw Food Day. It is a day dedicated to spreading awareness about the benefits of raw food consumption. It also helps highlight its long term advantages for our health. The 21st century has seen a rapid increase in the trend of fast food and other processed foods that have led to the increase in obesity levels and other non-communicable diseases like cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, etc. In the wake of such trends catching up, health experts point at the emergent need to go back to the basics, to turn to nature and turn to into a raw food enthusiast.

So what exactly is raw foodism and where can we trace back its origins? The history of raw food consumption – as a dietary and health movement- can be traced back to 1830 when an American Presbyterian minister Sylvester Graham propagated the benefits of raw food diet to combat the cholera epidemic that the country was grappling with. Apparently, the Swiss would take away the credit for being amongst the first to develop raw food as a dietary health treatment. In the late 19th century, a Swiss doctor, Maximilian Bircher Benner stumbled upon the benefits of raw food diet. It was when he was suffering from jaundice that he ate a lot of raw apples and after his recovery he conducted experiments to study the effects of raw foods on human health and the immune system.

Shifting gears to the contemporary scenario now, raw food diets have been rapidly gaining popularity all across the world. From raw food movements like raw foodism and raw veganism to special raw juice camps held in places like Portugal. Raw food, simply speaking, is food that has not been cooked, processed or exposed to any kind of chemicals or food engineering. It is consumed in its rawest and freshest form, technically, it is food that is not cooked or heated above 118 degrees. The thrust of the raw food diet is the consumption of unprocessed, whole plant-based, ideally organic foods. Nutritionists suggest that a minimum of three-quarters of a person’s diet should consist of uncooked food. The higher the proportion of raw foods in our diet, the healthier we will be.

organic-food_600.jpg

Why is raw food beneficial for one’s health? Experts and researchers in the field of health and nutrition have long stood by the benefits of raw food consumption. It is believed that just a little raw food in your diet can do wonders to your health. Raw food consumption can be an ideal way to get your daily quota of five portions of fruit and vegetables. It can help you get rid of stress, energizing your mind and body. Raw foods are full of essential nutrients, enzymes, vitamins and minerals, which are usually lost when processed or cooked. Not only this, raw foods are tad low on calories, they can help you maintain healthy skin, lustrous hair, better eyesight and can also help you boost your immunity and shed weight.(More: Busted! Common myths about raw food consumption.)

 

As they say, every good thing has a flip side to it, so does the raw food diet. Experts advise to exercise a little caution while consuming raw foods. Make sure that the foods and fruits are fresh. Wash them properly and if needed boil them. Do not use foods that have been stored for a long period of time. Take notice of the slightest of change in the natural colour or smell of the food. Ensure proper storage. Maintaining hygiene is of the utmost importance.
 
In India raw food consumption has not yet picked up as a trend. There are many factors that we can point to, the most important ones are poor hygiene and our extreme weather conditions. I personally remember the instance when I had consumed sliced raw cucumber from a local shop and ended up throwing up for a couple of days. Eating raw foods from the local shops can prove to be quite a daunting experience, as you never really know what kind of water is being used, how clean the cutlery is and above all, how hygiene friendly they themselves have been while handing over that plate of fruit salad to you. It is best to buy food items and make your own salads, smoothies and chaats at home, make sure that they are cleaned and washed properly.

Having said that, whether you plan to include a little raw food in your daily intake or want to be that dauntless enthusiast to plunge headlong into a full fledged raw food diet, we can ensure that you’ll never run short of recipe ideas. One of the best things about raw food is that you can cut them, mix them together with a bit of spices and herbs and add a little glamour to the otherwise bland affair. Read ahead to explore your options, from garden fresh salads to refreshing smoothies, here is our bumper list of recipes that will make you fall in love with raw food. Forget your cola and junk and get down to some serious raw food cooking!

Beet Feta and Orange Salad
Recipe by Vicky Ratnani

Experience the freshness and rich colours adorning your plate. Beetroot, oranges and lettuce come together, bathed in yogurt dressing and topped with nuts, herbs and feta.
 

beet_600.jpg

5 Best smoothies

Blend together some of your favourite fruits along with some milk or yogurt. Sip on the goodness or raw food and energize yourself.

 

smoothies_600.jpg

Mediterranean Watermelon Salad
Recipe by Vicky Ratnani

Here is a raw food treat that is wholesome and satisfying. Some of the best hydrating raw foods come together and create a colourful melange with an addition of subtle herbs and dressing.

 

watermelonjh_600.jpg

Mixed Vegetable SaladRecipe by Niru Gupta

Here is the world’s healthiest deal for you. A medley of greens and colourful veggies tossed in tangy vinegar and pepper. Add a bit of yogurt for that creamy texture and a dash of honey for the perfectly balanced flavour.

Raw Papaya Salad
Recipe by Roopa Gulati

Grated raw papaya, tossed in chilli sauce, red chillies, peanuts and lime juice and crowned with fresh coriander

 

papayasalad_600.jpg

Green Salad With Feta
Recipe by Ritu Dalmia

Bright and fresh salad with crunchy nuts, salad greens, tomatoes, onions, lime juice and a drizzle of light dressing.

 

greenssalad_med.jpg

Sproutamin Salad
Recipe by Vicky Ratnani

Indulge in a wholesome and nourishing goodness of this super salad. Throw in all your favourite fruits and bean sprouts. From kiwis, olives, cherry tomatoes to chowli, methi and other bean sprouts. Theses are mixed together with an addition of pepper, feta cheese and olive oil dressing.

 

beansand sproutssalad_600.jpg

Aam Rass
Recipe by Niru Gupta
Sip on the nectar of on of your favourite fruit. Delighting, fresh, hydrating and energizing.

 

amras_600.jpg

Tabbouleh Salad
Recipe by Aditya Bal

It can’t get healthier than this! Bring on a healthy treat packed with daliya, mint, parsley and olives bathed in olive oil and pepper.

Apple and Celery Salad
Recipe by Aditya Bal

Fresh apples and garden fresh celery brought together with simple olive oil, honey and lime juice dressing.

 

appleandcelerysalad_600.jpg

 

Raw Food Warning: Why Uncooked Flour Can Make You Sick – Live Science

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Raw Food Warning: Why Uncooked Flour Can Make You Sick
Credit: eldar nurkovic/Shutterstock.com

The Food and Drug Administration recently made a perhaps surprising recommendation: Don’t eat raw flour.

The warning issued last week came in response to an outbreak of E. coli that has sickened at least 42 people in 21 states since December. The FDA tracked the outbreak to a batch of General Mills flour sold under the brand names Gold Medal, Gold Medal Wondra and Signature Kitchens, triggering a recall.

Most people who read the recommendation probably already knew they weren’t supposed to eat cookie dough because of the raw eggs in it (though people donꞌt always do what theyꞌre supposed to do). But the flour recommendation was flummoxing, particularly because of the FDA’s explanation: Flour is a field food, the agency said in a June 28 consumer update. If pathogens get into the wheat plants while they are growing in a field — via wild animal waste, for example — they’ll stay in through the milling process.

That advice makes sense. Except that people eat lots of field foods raw. If raw flour is dangerous, what about a spinach salad or a bowl of fresh strawberries? Why hasn’t the FDA declared all raw foods a no-go? [Top 7 Germs in Food That Make You Sick]

Live Science spoke with an FDA expert and an outside food safety researcher who had the answers. Bottom line: Yes, salad can cause illness, and produce has been linked to many more outbreaks than flour. But the risk of illness from raw produce is better understood than the largely unquantified risk from grains. And fruits and vegetables are processed under the assumption that people will eat them raw, whereas flour isn’t.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly half of foodborne illnesses are caused by produce. So why raise the red flag over flour?

“We just want to provide consumers with the best information to take steps to reduce their risk,” said Jenny Scott, a senior adviser in the office of food safety at the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. “The same thing happens when we have a produce outbreak.”

But the ways that people traditionally use flour did influence both the timing and the content of the recommendation. Typically, Scott told Live Science, people don’t eat raw flour in large quantities.

“Because people donꞌt think of raw flour as being a concern, that’s one of the reasons we’re making the effort to get the information out,” she said. The risk of illness from raw flour is low, she said, but then, so is the risk from raw produce.

The current flour-related outbreak is the second of two such outbreaks in the past seven years. The earlier one was a 2009 outbreak of another strain of E. coli caused by Nestlé Toll House prepackaged cookie dough, which — surprise, surprise — people were eating raw. Exhibiting a clear-eyed realism about human nature, Nestlé opted to start heat-treating all of the flour in its raw cookie dough.

Some recent changes in consumer behavior may explain the appearance of this newest flour-related outbreak, Scott said. Some pizzerias, for example, have started giving kids balls of raw dough to play with while they wait for their meals. But also, improvements in epidemiology now allow researchers to detect and track outbreaks that might have gone unnoticed in earlier years, she said.

“It happens once, you think, ‘Well, that’s a fluke, not really an issue,'” Scott said. “It happens twice, you start thinking, ‘Hmm, maybe there is something here.'”

Food safety experts are now aware of the flour risk, but are only beginning to understand it. Outbreaks related to produce have been studied intensively for two decades, starting with a massive outbreak of infection with the parasite Cyclospora in 1996 (it eventually was traced to raspberries imported from Guatemala). By comparison, there isn’t much data on the prevalence of pathogens in flour, said Ben Chapman, a professor of food safety at North Carolina State University. 

“Over 20 years, we have a pretty good understanding, or a better understanding, of fresh produce consumption, but when it comes to flour, we don’t know,” Chapman told Live Science. “It’s hard to make risk-management decisions based on unknowns.”

No one really knows how General Mills’ flour became contaminated, or if contamination is a widespread problem among other brands. E. coli can spread through animal feces, so wildlife pooping in and around fields might be the culprit. But untreated irrigation water could spread the bacteria, too, Chapman said, or there could be some sort of cross-contamination during the milling process. No one knows how long E. coli or other pathogens persist in dry foods like flour, he said.

“It’s still relatively new for us to be looking at this as a community,” he said.

As for produce, which is currently responsible for far more outbreaks than raw flour, the FDA is making strides on safety. The agency recently released a new Produce Safety rule under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act that requires specific water quality guidelines and testing for irrigation water, rules for manure and compost use, and standards related to worker hygiene and equipment and tools. Raw sprouts, the culprit in 42 outbreaks between 1996 and 2014, get special attention under the new rule. [Top 10 Science Buzzkills: Studies that Ruin Your Fun]

Grains aren’t covered under the new Produce Safety rule, but both producers and regulators will likely be looking at ways to reduce the risk of contamination, Chapman and Scott said. Widespread heat-treatment of flour seems unlikely at this point due to the lack of infrastructure and technology to treat the grain supply, according to Scott.

But with huge grain-consuming companies like Nestlé and General Mills linked to outbreaks, producers will be examining their supply chains and processing practices, Chapman said.

“It’s bad business, being linked to outbreaks,” he said.

Original article on Live Science.