Top 7 Belly Fat Burning Foods to Lose Tummy Fat and Get Flat Abs

In this article, I want to share 7 top belly fat burning foods to help you get flat abs. I believe that if you incorporate these foods in your diet that you will find it much easier to lose weight. If you do not you may get less than optimal results.

It is simply a fact that what you eat is the most importan factor in how fast and efficiently you lose fat and weight. This should be your main focus.

Here are the 7 belly fat burning foods you should include in your diet:

1. Eggs – This superfood is a top source of protein and a host of other goodies. Protein helps to build muscle tissue and boost metabolism and can also help to make you feel full for longer and so is a good appetites suppressant. Whole eggs are fine as the yolk has many nutrients you can use.

2. Oatmeal – Rich in fiber this often underrated food helps to keep you full, improve your digestive process, provides a source of good energy and helps you to maintain the necessary calorie deficit to lose weight.

3. Broccoli – This is a nutrient packed vegatable and actually helps to burn off belly fat because it contains phytonutrients. These are elements that help to fight xenoestrogens, chemicals which are common in our food supply that induce more abdominal fat storage. By eating broccoli, you reduce the effect of xenoestrogens on your body.

4. Almonds and nuts – These are sources of protein and lots of healthy fats. You need healthy fats to function properly and to lose belly fat, so these foods are an essential and excellent addition to your regular meals.

5. Low fat dairy – While these foods do not actually induce more fat burning (although they are rich in protein), research shows that a greater consumption of dairy helps your body to get rid of fat through its secretions. This can amount to a few pounds a year so it's worth noting.

6. Garlic – While this food may not be the best food to eat before a big date, it is considered very healthy. Garlic contains allicin, an element with multiple health benefits which is also said to fight off fats in your body.

7. Tuna – Another rich source of protein and healthy fats for greater metabolism and more rapid fat burning.

Eat these belly fat burning foods regularly and you will see faster results.

Guide to Standardized Recipe

Standardized Recipe Ideology

A standardized recipe refers to a particular standard-of-use of certain metrics in cooking – Standard sizes, time, temperature, amount, etc. Abiding by this rule creates uniformity in kitchen produce, whether or not it is tangible or intangible.

The idea of ​​a standardized recipe is definitely not alien to many of us anymore. In fact, it has been very widely used around the globe and there are certain metrics to a standardized recipe that we must follow. In the kitchen, a standardized recipe is a crucial part of standardizing dishes, ingredients and elements in a restaurant that might lead to gain or loss during operational hours. Certain restaurants benchmark standardized recipes in their kitchen, some do not. There are pros and cons of using standardized recipes.

Benefits of having a Standardized Recipe

  1. Creates an absolute standard in kitchen produce and cooking activities.
  2. Allows smooth transition between different kitchen staffs.
  3. Maintains food quality and food standards during kitchen operational hours.
  4. Guiding tool for newcomers to the kitchen.
  5. Refresh minds of kitchen staff after some time . (Eliminating guesswork)
  6. Referral material should there be any disputes.
  7. Base for costing when kitchen costs are calculated .
  8. Be a great guide to implementing a new menu should there be any need.
  9. Planning and costing purposes when a particular event needs accounting / kitchen control auditing.
  10. Prevents raw food leftovers (with good Kitchen Control)

Cons of having a Standardized Recipe

  1. Inconvenient – This can be from the Head Chef keeping the list of standardized recipe in his room and had it locked or having three big books of standardized recipe and need kitchen staff to flip over one by one to get everything done. Inconvenience is the number ONE factor that led to kitchen staff not using standardized recipes.
  2. Time consuming – This is also one of the reasons why standardized recipe are not followed. During peak hours, a kitchen do not have time to waste, and every second counts.
  3. Better variations – Some Chefs prefer to follow their centric of taste, some are just worship their own believes. This could cause a problem when there is no proper training provided and Kitchen Control.
  4. Rules are meant to be broken – There are always different people / consumers around your restaurant. What's important, the customers. When standardized recipes are not tested regularly on the restaurant, inaccurate information may be provided in the standardized recipe. Solution: Leave room or space for food / cooking variation. This usually happen when the Head Chef is not properly organized or trained well for his position.
  5. A secret no more – Some restaurateurs or Chefs frown on making a book of standardized recipe because they want to protect their food knowledge. This is a classic perception: Someone comes by, takes all the recipe and leave the restaurant after a month.
  6. When it's gone, it's really gone – At certain times in a restaurant, a piece of recipe sheet can get lost. When it's lost, there will be a slight havoc in understanding as the Head Chef needs to take action immediately. On another situation, it can also be 'stolen' or 'retrieved' as management of the restaurant changes, and / or someone steals the particular information, or the restaurant faces mishaps like kitchen on fire.

Standardized recipes do not necessarily have certain standards that you need to follow. There are many ways to actually personalize your standardized recipe, keep them into your book and use them for referrals in the future. Alternatively, you can also save them into your computer, and organize them well. Whatever it is, standardized recipes serve good purposes in a kitchen – Take the time to actually follow the steps, and you might just get happier guests / customers.

There are three (3) common ways of writing a recipe:

  1. Paragraph-style recipes
  2. List-style recipes
  3. Action-style recipes

Paragraph Style Recipes This way of writing a recipe is classic – And they serve their own purpose in writing that way. There are many pros and cons to this kind of writing style, and we'd like to leave it up to you to figure it out. Anyway, here's an example of a paragraph-style written recipe:

Put your skillet on the pan and turn on the heat to low. Now take a bowl, crack 2 fresh eggs inside and add in some salt and pepper. Next, grab a whisk and start beating it until it's mixed or quite fluffy. When your skillet is hot enough, add in 1 tbsp of oil, and swirl the oil around. You'll notice the oil runs faster on hot pans. When your pan and oil is hot enough, turn on the heat to high and pour in your eggs. Leave the heat on high until your eggs (at the side of the pan) forms a solid texture. At this time, reduce your heat to low. When your egg is cooked enough, flip it over and top it off with some ikan kering! Voilá!

Paragraph-style recipes can work at certain extent. Be sure to choose your methods of writing well.

List-style Recipes The list-style writing of recipes is one of the easiest, practical and most common ways of writing a recipe. This method consist of two sections – The header, and footer. Header consist of different elements such as recipe title, temperature, yield, time, etc, while the footer contains methods to use these ingredients. An example of list-style recipes:

-Eggs With Ikan Kering 2 no Eggs
-1 Tbsp Oil
-Ikan Kering

  1. Heat up your pan in low heat, crack two eggs into a bowl and add seasoning. Whisk well.
  2. When your pan is hot enough, add in your oil and wait until it's hot.
  3. Pour it in and turn your heat to high, until you see the sides of your eggs are actually solid in texture.
  4. Reduce your heat to low, and cook the eggs well. Flip over.
  5. Top it off with some crumbled ikan kering and voilá!

Action-style recipes Action style recipes has been known as the killer way of listing recipes, amount, methods and ingredients in a very organized and well-mannered. The first step will usually contain ingredients and methods limited to only a particular food preparation, and the list continues and combines with step two and three. Here's an example:

Action-style recipes can be very directive and you can add in more information to your liking. Choose which is best for you and your audience, then pick the right one and give them value.

Standard Elements in a Standardized Recipe Although we may see certain standard recipe metrics in a standardized recipe that may be both relevant and irrelevant to you, there are certain practical usage to it, and customizing your standardized recipe a good way to go when you need to emphasize certain recipe metrics in a recipe sheet . In a way, always think of your end-users rather than yourself.

Common Recipe Elements in a Standardized Recipe

  1. Ingredients
  2. Temperature
  3. Equipments & Utensils Needed
  4. Amount
  5. Method
  6. Media (Picture / Video)

These metrics are the basics – But what makes a better Standardized Recipe is to actually explain in detail what is the outcome, what should you avoid, what should you do and not do, etc. While these may be too long to squeeze into your methods area or the miscellaneous box in the action style recipe, you should include a section to it.

Recommended Standard Recipe Elements to Add These recommended standard recipe elements are absolutely optional and should only be included at selected times. Note that most recipes require only the simplest of steps to take, and portrayal of information should be as concise, clear and to the point as possible.

  1. Taste – At what degree should this dish taste like, and how you can stretch its seasoning properties from there.
  2. Precautions and Warnings – Precautions while handling these food mix or cooking methods.
  3. Tips & Advice – Best way to beef up preparation methods and cook well without the need for practical training.
  4. What to do while waiting – Important steps or methods to follow or take while waiting cooking or preparing a food ingredient or food ingredient mixes, etc.
  5. Alternatives – Alternatives to this cooking method, or that food ingredient which might not be available in certain areas of the world. Should there be any alternative ways to do it, it should be pointed out.
  6. Halal status – Halal status is very important . Certain foods are pre-packed in a non-halal manner, or foods containing pork-based materials used in preparation or alcohol usage. For example, rum flavoring. Comes in halal and non-halal.
  7. Garnishing recommendations – This should be included and portrayed after recipe methods.
  8. Miscellaneous information – This information should be portrayed at the very bottom of the recipe, stating ways on how to prepare and cut this meat, or measure the intensity of cooking in the meat. This could also serve as a section where you throw in a combination of Taste (No. 1) and Tips & Advice (No. 3).

Want to Live Longer? Drink Sour Milk (or Fermented Foods!)

That is a famous quote from the eastern European country of Georgia (formerly of the Soviet Union) relating to the long life of the people in that region. They have traditionally consumed large amounts of fermented foods, including yogurt, but this is not very realistic in many areas of the world today, including the United States. Many people are lactose intolerant, but you can still eat fermented foods!

Today the benefits of fermented foods are really catching on, but did you know that the fermentation process was originally used to improve the keeping and storing of foods? It's thought that camel, buffalo, goat, sheep and cow milk were initially fermented naturally into yogurt. The hot temperatures (110 F) of the North African deserts were ideal for lactic acid-producing bacteria to ferment the milk carried by camels in goat bags. Almost every region in the world has developed fermented foods in their quest to acquire new tastes and improve shelf life. Farmers, rather than scientists, used their ingenuity and imagination. They were thinking in terms of how to best provide for their families, not realizing that thousands of years later, scientists would be examining the potential health benefits of fermented foods.

Elie Metchnikoff, a famous Russian Nobel prize-winning Bacteriologist looked into the possible health benefits of fermented foods in the early 1900's. He noticed that Bulgarians had an average life span of 87 years-that was much longer than the 50 year life expectancy in the US at that time and almost 10 years longer than even today's average life expectancy of 78 years! One of the most significant differences in their lifestyle was the consumption of fermented milks! Since Metchnikoff's original study, researchers have found that many populations use fermented foods. Georgians, from what was formally known as the Soviet Union, live over 100 years and are playing polo and working in the farm fields! They attribute their long lives to fermented or "sour" milk, which is where the quote from the title of this blog came from! I'm not sure I would want to be working in the farm fields at 100, but I'd love to still be riding my horses at that age!

I know that my family has greatly benefited from fermented foods. My husband and I are in our 50's, feeling and looking better than we did in our 30's! CJ's intestinal issues are healed, his mind is clear and his body is healthy. In fact, all our children are healthy. I KNOW that we would not be where we are health wise today without the benefits of raw organic fermented probiotic foods.

There are so many benefits of eating fermented foods and researchers just keep adding more things to the list. Here are some of the benefits of fermented foods:

  • Improves digestive function
  • Improves bowel function
  • Improves mood
  • Improves liver function
  • Decreases wrinkles
  • Improves circulatory function
  • Improves joint and muscle function
  • Improves sleep function
  • Improves resistance to allergies
  • Improves vitamin absorption
  • Improves lactose tolerance
  • Improves gluten tolerance
  • Improves appetite
  • Improves skin quality
  • Improves metabolism
  • Improves mental clarity (gut-brain connection)
  • Decreases your digestive ailments
  • Decreases your stomach ailments
  • Decreases incidence of heart burn
  • Decreases incidence of constipation
  • Decreases incidence of diarrhea
  • Decreases the presence of yeast infections
  • Decreases incidence of oral cavity infections
  • Decreases gas and bloating
  • Increases nutritional absorption
  • Increases energy
  • Increases hydration

Sometimes we are so overwhelmed with modern technology that we forget the benefits of simplicity. Today there are so many genetically modified refined and processed foods polluting our bodies. They were designed to make our lives easier, but that does NOT mean healthier! Our ancestors were onto something by fermenting their foods to keep them edible for longer periods of time. Our bodies can not handle the chemicals it takes to keep foods stable / fresh on our shelves for years. I'd much rather have the "good" bacteria from my fermented foods in my gut, rather than subject my body to the harmful toxins in processed foods. It's a "no brainer!" The if you have The So not tried Real Food Real Life's the raw, organic fermented probiotics yet, please do-you're going to notice a Healthier, happier you, not to mention physically better looking! Educate yourself on what cultured / fermented foods are available (such as miso, kimchi, sauerkraut and kefir, to name a few) and how you can add them into your daily diet. A fun family adventure would be to do a Internet search quick on what fermented foods YOUR ancestors ate! Mine made and ate fermented meats and cheese like salmon and parmesan.

Eat Fermented Foods!

Eat Well, Be Well, "Live Longer"

11 Foods That Help Boost Your Sex Drive

Throughout history, humans have sought and tried various edibles that will help in guaranteeing the ability to rise to any sexual occasion. Aphrodisiacs are generally thought of as any substance that arouses or intensifies sexual desire. Fortunately, recent studies have discovered that some of the best-known edible aphrodisiacs do in reality contain certain vitamins and minerals that contribute to a healthy reproductive system and invariably to a healthy libido.

The reason certain foods boost sex drive is because they contain specific vital nutrients needed by the brain and body to regulate the levels of sex hormones and the circulatory system for optimal performance, and not because they contain any magical ingredient. With sufficient supply of these nutrients to your brain and body, vigorous sexual health is a natural end result. Best of all, instead of side-effects, most of these foods throw in some side-benefits.

To get in the mood for romance and so much more, uncovered here is a list of 11 natural sex aphrodisiacs to help increase your hormonal levels and to get your libido soaring.

Bananas

An almost ideal and power-packed food, banana is a good source of dietary fibre, Vitamin C, potassium and manganese. Bananas are equally a very good source of Vitamin B-Complex like riboflavin which are important for the conversion of carbohydrates into energy and which is also suggested to help in the manufacture of sex hormones such as testosterone. Bananas are also rich in bromelain, an enzyme purported to increase libido and reverse impotence in men. Bananas are indeed a sure-fire way to increase your sexual energy.

Dark Chocolate

This quintessential lover's gift contains phenylethylamine, the same pleasure-producing chemical that gives you a feeling of well-being and excitement and usually released when we fall in love. Getting the darkest, richest chocolate is important. Instead of milk chocolate, opt for the dark chocolate with at least 70% of cocoa content as they contain less of the sugar, fat and other things. Chocolate also provide antioxidants, which are great for maintaining the body's immune system.

Ginger

The powerful and high prized medicinal ginger roots, raw, cooked or crystallised, stimulates the circulatory system, relaxing blood vessels and boosting blood flow to the genitals. The pungent principles (including the volatile oil gingerol) are the most medicinally potent because they inhibit prostaglandin and leukotriene (products in the body that influence blood flow and inflammation). They also give ginger its pungent aroma. Some of the most effective forms of ginger include the powdered, encapsulated form; ginger tea prepared from sliced ​​ginger root; or candied pieces.

Avocados

This almost too delicious to be healthy fruit aside from being very low in cholesterol and sodium, is also a good source of dietary fibre, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, lots of minerals and amino acids, and contains a high level of folic acid which help metabolise proteins for generating more energy. The fat in avocados is monounsaturated and they also contain vitamin B6 which increases male and female hormone production. Avocados are rich in vitamin E (an antioxidant) which is vital for overall sexual function.

Almonds

The aroma of almonds is thought to arouse passion in women. Almonds are low in cholesterol but chock-full of calcium and vitamin E, and are also a good source of magnesium, potassium, protein, and phosphorus. In general, most nuts (walnut, peanut, and Brazil nut) are great sources of nutrients that promote sexual health, and often contain phosphorus and zinc. Nuts can be high in calorie so do not over-indulge.

Oyster

The reputation that oysters are good for your sex life is nothing but the truth, as they are indeed one of the classic aphrodisiacs. They are purportedly the richest food source of zinc which promotes healthy sperm and testosterone production, making this food a winner. Testosterone is equally known to stimulate the female libido as well.

Recent scientific evidence suggests that mussels, clams, and oysters deliver two types of amino acids that spark the release of sex hormones in both men and women. Oysters are also a good source of protein, Vitamin C, phosphorus, riboflavin, niacin, Vitamin B12, iron, copper, manganese and selenium.

Asparagus

This purported phallic shape aphrodisiac contains the phytochemical glutathione, which has excellent antioxidant properties. Asparagus also has a good supply of Vitamin E, considered to stimulate production of sex hormones and may be essential for a healthy sex life.

Celery

Celery can be a fantastic raw food source for sexual stimulation as it contains androsterone, an odourless hormone released during male perspiration and which can act as a pheromone to trigger female attraction.

Figs

Symbolic of the male and female sex organs, the sweet fresh juice taste of figs is highly pleasurable to the human senses. Figs are high in amino acids, which are believed to help in boosting libido. Also they are a superb source of fibre, magnesium, iron, and calcium.

Honey

This "nectar of Aphrodite" has its roots firmly in history, going all the way back to ancient cave paintings to include its aphrodisiac popularity from the libido-enhancing power of the ancient fermented honey drink called "mead". This food is one of the fastest ways to provide your body with sexual energy because it contains simple carbohydrates that are easily digested providing instant energy and fuel for working muscles.

Honey is also rich in Vitamin B-Complex which aid in the function of the neurotransmitters responsible for sexual arousal and also for testosterone production. Combine a few spoonfuls of honey with a glass of milk, and a handful of nuts, and you'll give yourself lots of explosive power. This is arguably why getaways for newlyweds' are called "honeymoon".

Garlic

Garlic is one of the most potent disease fighters in the plant kingdom, natural and harmless, and having a pronounced aphrodisiac effect. Most of the health benefits are derived from the over one hundred sulphur compounds it contains, especially allicin, which is responsible for its characteristic scent and flavour. Allicin also helps in increasing blood flow to the genitals making garlic a highly effective herb for increasing libido.

Studies have shown that regularly consumption of garlic can be very helpful in slowing the build-up of plaque on the arteries, prevent the formation of blood clots, and help lower blood pressure thus leading to a general increase in blood circulation. However, if the odour will be a deterrent, you can try the capsules instead.

List of Pus and Mucus-Forming Foods

The word "mucus" is from the Latin mucus which means "slime, mold, snot, etc." Mucus refers to a thick, viscous, slippery discharge that is comprised of dead cells, mucin, inorganic salts, water, and exfoliated cells. It also refers to the slimy, sticky, viscous substance left behind by mucus-forming foods in the body after ingestion. The word "pus" is from late 14c. Latin "pus" (related to puter [putrid] "rotten"), from Proto-Indo-European * pu- compared to Sanskrit. puyati "rots, stinks," putih "stinking, foul." Pus often refers to a thick white, yellowish, or greenish opaque liquid produced in infected tissue, consisting of dead white blood cells, bacteria, tissue debris, and serum. It also refers to the substance that dead animal flesh is chemically changed to after being consumed or while rotting in one's digestive tract. The ingestion of meat and dairy products create pus residue in the body, while starchy and fatty foods are mucus-forming.

The word "mucusless," or mucus -free, refers to foods that are not mucus-forming. Such foods digest without leaving behind a thick, viscous, slimy substance called mucus. These foods include all kinds of fat-free, and starchless, fruits and vegetables.

All foods that are pus / mucus-forming are acid-forming. The word "acid" is from the early 1600s meaning "of the taste of vinegar," from French acide (16c.) Or directly from Latin acidus "sour, sharp," adjective of state from acere "to be sour," from PIE root * ak- "sharp, pointed" (see acrid) .In chemistry it refers to a class of substances whose aqueous solutions are characterized by a sour taste, the ability to turn blue litmus red, and the ability to react with bases and certain metals to form salts. From a mucusless perspective, pus and mucus-forming foods are understood to be "acid-forming" inside the human body. Such foods create an acidic internal environment that is detrimental to wellness.

The following is a list of pus, mucus, and acid-forming foods:

FLESH (PUS-FORMING)

  • Blood of Animals
  • Eggs (All Kinds)
  • Lard
  • Meat (Beef, Chicken, Horse, Dog, Mutton / Lamb, Turkey, Veal, Pork:
  • Bacon, Ham, Sausage, Gammon, Chitterlings, Pig Feet; Wild Game: Bison, Buffalo, Ostrich, Rabbit, Venison, etc.)
  • Margarine (Made with Animal Fat)

FISH (PUS-FORMING)

  • Crustacean (Crab, Crawfish, Lobster, Shrimp)
  • Fish (All Types)
  • Mollusks (Clam, Oysters, Mussels, Snail, etc.)
  • Roe (Caviar)
  • Salmon
  • Shell Fish

DAIRY PRODUCTS (PUS-FORMING)

  • Butter, Cow
  • Buttermilk
  • Cheese (All Kinds)
  • Cream
  • Crème fraîche
  • Kefir
  • Milk (All Animals and Kinds; Raw Organic, Skim, 1 or 2%, etc.)
  • Yogurt

CEREALS (MODERATELY MUCUS-FORMING)

  • Barley
  • Breads (All Kinds; Barley, Black, Rye, White, Graham, Pumpernickel,
  • Zwieback, etc.)
  • Cereal Grains (All Kinds; Maize, Farina, Kamut, Millet,
  • Oats, Quinoa, Spelt, White Rice, Brown Rice, Whole or Refined Wheat, etc.)
  • Cornmeal
  • Pseudocereals (All Kinds; Amaranth, Buckwheat, Chia, Cockscomb, Kañiwa, Quinoa, etc.)
  • Pastas

BEANS (MODERATELY MUCUS-FORMING)

  • Beans (All Kinds and Forms; Black Beans, Black-eyed peas, Fava Beans, Butter Beans, Cannellini Beans, Chickpeas / Garbanzo Beans, Edamame, Great Northern Beans, Italian Beans, Kidney Beans, Lentils, Lima Beans, Mung Beans, Navy Beans, Pinto Beans, Soy Beans, Split Peas, String Beans (Green Beans), White Beans, etc.)

NUTS AND SEEDS (MUCUS-FORMING)

  • Nuts (All Kinds; Acorns, Almonds, Brazil Nuts, Cashews, Chestnuts, Hazelnuts, Peanuts, Pecans, Pistachios', Walnuts, etc.)
  • Seeds (All Kinds; Sunflower, Pumpkin, Hemp, Sesame, etc.)

PROCESSED FOODS (PUS AND / OR VERY MUCUS-FORMING)

  • Dried Convenience Foods
  • Fast Foods
  • Frozen Convenience Foods
  • Packaged Convenience Foods
  • Processed Meat

CONFECTIONERIES / CANDY / SWEETS (PUS AND / OR VERY MUCUS-FORMING)

  • Baked Goods (All kinds including pies, cakes, pastries, etc.)
  • Candy (All Types; Bars, Caramels, Chocolate, Fudge, Jelly candies, Rock
  • Candy, Taffy
  • Gelatin (Jello)
  • Ice Cream (Dairy and Non-Dairy)
  • Marshmallow

ACIDIC, FERMENTED, OR DISTILLED DRINKS / SYRUPS (ACID-FORMING STIMULANTS)

  • Alcoholic Beverages (All Kinds; Ale, Beer, Brandy, Champagne, Hard
  • Cider, Liqueur, Mead, Porter, Rum, Sake / Rice Wine, Gin, Herbal Wine, Lager, Fruit Wine, Vodka Whisky, Tequila, etc.)
  • Syrups (Brown Rice, Barley Malt, Chocolate, Corn, Artificially Flavored)
  • Cocoa
  • Coffee
  • Kombucha Tea
  • Soft Drink (Soda Pop)
  • Tea (All Kinds from the Theaceae family)
  • Vinegar (White, Apple Cider)
  • Old-fashioned Root Beer

FERMENTED FOODS AND SAUCES (ACID-FORMING STIMULANTS)

  • Fish Sauce
  • Fermented Vegetables (All; Kimchi / cabbage and other veggies, Olives
  • Pickles / cucumbers. Sauerkraut / cabbage, etc.)
  • Miso
  • Sauces with Vinegar (Hot Sauce, Ketchup, Mustard, Mayonnaise, Relish,
  • Tartar, Barbecue, Salad Dressings, Salsa, etc.)
  • Soy Sauce

VEGETARIAN / VEGAN PROCESSED FOODS (MODERATELY MUCUS FORMING)

  • Chips (corn, potato, plantain, etc.)
  • Frozen Vegan Breakfast Foods (waffels, etc.)
  • Hummus (processed chickpeas)
  • Lab Grown Animal Tissue
  • Margarine
  • Nutritional Yeast
  • Pasta (egg-free)
  • Pasteurized 100% Fruit Juice (potentially acid-forming)
  • Plant milks (grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes including soy, rice, etc.)
  • Plant-based butter (nuts, seeds, and legumes including soy, peanut, etc.)
  • Plant-based creamers
  • Soy Lecithin (food additive)
  • Tempeh
  • Texturized Vegetable Protein ( 'mock' meats including soy, etc.)
  • Tofu
  • Vegan Baked Goods
  • Vegan Confections (All Types; Chocolates, Ice Cream, etc.)
  • Vegan Cheese Substitutes
  • Vegan Mayonnaise
  • Vegan Whipped Cream
  • Yogurts (Plant-based)

OILS (FATTY AND MILDLY MUCUS FORMING)

  • Oil (All types; Avocado Oil, Chia Seed, Coconut, Corn, Cotton Seed, Cotton Seed, Flax Seed, Grape Seed, Hemp Seed, Nut Oils, Olive, Palm, Peanut, Quinoa, Rapeseed (Including Canola), Safflower, Soybean etc.)

SALTS AND SPICES (STIMULANTS / POTENTIALLY ACID-FORMING)

  • Black Peppercorns
  • Cayenne Pepper
  • Chili Powder
  • Cream of Tarter
  • Curry Powder
  • Nutmeg
  • Paprika
  • Pepper
  • Salt (Celery, Crystal, Iodized, Sea)
  • Vanilla Extract

STARCHY OR FATTY VEGETABLES AND FRUITS (SLIGHTLY MUCUS-FORMING)

  • Artichoke
  • Avocados
  • Cassava
  • Cauliflower
  • Coconut Meat
  • Corn
  • Durian
  • Fungus (Mushrooms)
  • Green Peas
  • Olives
  • Parsnips
  • Peas (Raw)
  • Plantain
  • Plantains
  • Pumpkins
  • Raw or Baked White Potatoes
  • Raw Squashes (Winter, Acorn, Butternut, etc.)
  • Raw Sweet Potatoes
  • Rutabaga
  • Turnip
  • Unripe Banana

What are Deceptive Mucus-Formers?

Here is a list of foods that many people do not realize create mucus:

  • Rice (great for creating glue to bind books, bad for the transition to a mucus-free diet)
  • Avocados (fatty item that may be used on the transition, but are highly addictive. Although technically a fruit, if used it is best to combine them with a mucus-free combination salad or vegetables to aid elimination. However, it is recommended to stay away from them if you are not already stuck to them.)
  • Nuts (Mucus-forming, but may be used on the transition. It is best to eat with dried fruits like raisins to aid with elimination.)
  • Plantains (Starchy)
  • Tofu (Slimy and mucus-forming.)
  • Un-ripened fruits like green bananas (the riper the fruit you eat the better).
  • Corn (It does not eliminate well. When cooked corn or corn chips are eating it becomes mushy and slimy in the intestines.)
  • Corn chips (Some people use them on the transition, but they are very addictive and do not eliminate well)
  • Beans (They are starchy and mucus-forming. But, they may be used sparingly on the transition within close proximity to green-leafy salads)
  • Starchy Vegetables (Some vegetalbes are starchy and mucus-forming in raw or cooked forms, such as white potatoes. But, many other vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, become almost mucus-free (starchless) after proper cooking.

The Transition Diet

It is very important that people learn how to transition from the most harmful mucus-forming foods to the ones that leave behind the least amount of waste. To learn more about this transitional process, check out Arnold Ehret's Mucusless Diet Healing System: Annotated, Revised, and Edited by Prof. Spira.

Filipino Recipes – Kilawin (Pork Liver) Recipe – Pinoy Food

Kilawin is always mistaken for raw fish cooked using vinegar only. That is a common misconception. For those people who need to know the difference, raw fish in vinegar is kinilaw while pork and liver cooked using vinegar is kilawin. Kilawin is a dish that originates from Pampanga, one of the provinces in Luzon.

Kilawin is not only good for ordinary meals but it is also highly favored during sessions of beer drinking. The tangy taste is a perfect beer match and my male cousins say it helps keep drunkenness away. But of course, they just say it to tease me and it is their way of sweet-talking me into preparing the recipe for them.

Ingredients:

  • 1½ cups pig liver (sliced)
  • 2 cups pork (sliced and boiled until tender)
  • 1½ tsp black pepper
  • 4 tbsp lard
  • 6 cloves garlic (minced)
  • 1 regular sized onion (sliced)
  • ½ cup native vinegar
  • ½ cup broth (from boiled pork)
  • Salt (to taste)

Cooking Procedure:

  • Soak liver in vinegar, salt and pepper for 5 minutes.
  • Sauté the garlic in lard until light brown. Add the onion and continue cooking until the onion is well cooked.
  • Add the liver which is already sliced and stir the mixture constantly for about 3 minutes and press the pieces of liver with the back of a wooden spoon so the juice will be extracted while frying.
  • Add the pork, stirring in the same manner and cook for about 2 minutes.
  • Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add vinegar diluted with the water. Simmer for at least 3 minutes.
  • Serve and enjoy.

What Do Crickets Eat?

Crickets are insects that belong to the Order Orthoptera and the Class Insecta. Crickets are an important part of the ecosystem since they help in the breakdown of plant material. They are also an important source of food for other animals like small owls, spiders, birds, mice, shrews, snakes, frogs, raccoons and opossums. There are many species of crickets: house crickets, field crickets, ground crickets, cave crickets, mole crickets, camel crickets, snowy tree cricket and mole crickets.

Crickets are reared and used as bait for fish and as food for some pets. The Chinese also use crickets in medicines. They are popularly used as a sport like cock fights. Crickets are also believed to bring luck. Rearing crickets is very easy since they tend to eat anything. Providing a nutritious diet to the crickets is very important as it helps in breeding. Another reason is that the nutrition from the cricket’s diet would be passed on to the pets, which each these crickets.

Crickets are omnivores and feed on almost anything-usually organic materials, plant decay, grass, fruits, seedling plants, fungi and even meat. Crickets need good diet otherwise they tend to feed on each other. Cricket foods are commercially available in the market at feed shops. There are specific brands of cricket feed also. For a few crickets, tropical fish make a good meal though it would be expensive. Rolled oats with fresh fruits and vegetables is an ideal food for crickets. Cornflakes, bread and digestive biscuits can also be given. Crickets also relish fruits like apples, bananas and grapes and vegetables like tomatoes, potatoes, lettuce and cabbage. Chicken laying mash is also good cricket food and is cost effective for feeding large number of crickets. Some food supplements like alfalfa, calcium supplements and raw vegetable scraps can also be added for additional nutrition. The food can be placed in an open and shallow container that is placed firmly on the ground. This container needs to be cleaned regularly to prevent the formation of mold.

Crickets also need a good supply of water. However, keep the water away from the food to keep the food dry and fresh. Insert cotton swabs into the water vessel to prevent the crickets from drowning. Raising crickets is very easy.

The Good and the Bad of the Atkins Diet

Here is a break down of the Atkins diet, via three good points to the Atkins diet and three bad points of the Atkins diet.

The Atkins diet three good points.

1. The Atkins diet burns fat. When you begin the Atkins diet your body is switching from burning carbs for energy to burning ketones which come from fat for energy. The Atkins diet is designed to do this so your body becomes a fat burning machine.

Conventional diets use the concept of eat fewer calories than you use in a day which causes your body to burn fat reserves. The Atkins diet approach burns fat quicker because you take in less carbs and your body is forced into burning ketones.

2. You are not hungry on the Atkins diet. The Atkins diet has you eating your main source of protein from meats at each meal. By utilizing meat as your main source of protein your body feels full longer. Meat takes longer to digest which keeps you feeling full longer.

3. The Atkins diet has health benefits. In studies the Atkins diet has been shown in some people to reduce cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure. Also the Atkins diet may help to relieve the symptoms of acid reflux, diabetes and sleep apnea.

The Atkins diet three bad points.

1. The Atkins diet burns fat fast. Toxins that have built up in your body and stored in fat cells may be burned off too fast when you first begin the Atkins diet.

2. You may feel tired on the Atkins diet. When your body switches its fuel source from carbs to ketones in the first few days of the Atkins diet you may feel some form of fatigue. The tired feeling should begin to settle out as your body begins to adjust to the Atkins diet.

3. You eat fewer vegetables on the Atkins diet. The Atkins diet promotes more meat and fewer vegetables. Vegetables are an important source of minerals, fiber and calcium. When your body shifts to the Atkins diet you may suffer a loss in vegetable intake.

After you read the three good points of the Atkins diet and the three bad points of the Atkins diet it is up to you and your doctor to decide if the Atkins diet is the best choice for you.

Preparing Your Body For the Lemon Detox Diet

Before you start your detox, have a couple of meat free days and try and stick to fresh salads, fruit and raw veggies. Eat as little cooked food as possible and drink plenty of fresh, pure water.

This will enable your body to prepare itself and you will find that procedures like the salt water flush will be a lot smoother in a shorter period of time.

If you prepare your body for a few days, it already has the chance to expel a lot of the built up waste that can sometimes block a salt water flush from working within the first couple of days.

Many people are tempted to binge before starting their detox as they won’t be eating for 10 days (or however many days you choose to detox for) but this won’t do you any favors at all.

If you are starting your detox on a Monday, then pencil the start of your detox in for the preceding Friday. This will give you the weekend to gently prepare your body for the detox and it will make life a lot easier for yourself.

Think of these few days as the start of your detox, don’t focus on the Monday as the beginning of your cleanse. This was a mistake I made in my first cleanse and I think that it hampered me at the start. I didn’t binge before I started and I didn’t drink for a few days prior either but this was because mentally I was so longing to start, that my body was already ‘going off’ junk in anticipation of what was to come.

But I didn’t stick to a raw food diet and I didn’t cut back on caffeine – man, I wish I’d cut back on caffeine! Why didn’t someone tell me to cut back on the caffeine? But you live and learn and thankfully by reading this article, you are better prepared than I ever was!

So, to recap, lay off the cooked and processed foods, try to eat 80-90% raw if you can’t manage 100%, cut out alcohol and start to radically reduce your intake of caffeine.

If you have a high intake of caffeine – over 3 cups of tea or coffee a day, then I would highly suggest that you start to cut back for a period of at least a week prior to starting the cleanse. Trust me, you’ll thank me for this nugget of advice because come day 3, when your body is really succumbing to the cleanse, your caffeine withdrawal headache is going to feel like a marching band in your head.

Ever had a really bad migraine? This is worse and you can’t take any tablets as they are off limits! I spent day 3 in bed wanting to cut my head off! You won’t have to!

**TIP**

Make sure you have some soluble aspirin in the house. Your digestive system won’t have to break it down and if your headache is totally unbearable then you’ll be glad it’s on hand!

Food Guidelines For Basic Constitutional Types

Tridosha system

The central concept of Ayurvedic medicine is the theory that health exists when there is a balance between three fundamental bodily humours or doshas called Vata, Pitta and Kapha.

Vata is the impulse principle necessary to mobilize the function of the nervous system.

Pitta is the energy principle which uses bile to direct digestion and hence metabolism into the venous system.

Kapha is the body fluid principle which relates to mucous, lubrication and the carrier of nutrients into the arterial system.

All Ayurvedic physicians believe that these ancient ideas, based in the knowledge discovered by the sages, exist in harmony with physical reality. These concepts allow physicians to examine the homeostasis of the whole system. People may be of a predominant dosha or constitution, but all doshas have the basic elements within them.

The philosophy of Ayurveda

The emergence of different schools of Sanskrit philosophy like Nyaya, Vaisheshika, Sankhya, Yoga, Vedanta and Mimamsa was another landmark in the history of Indian medicine. The principles expounded in these philosophies facilitated the development within Ayurveda of its theory of humoral pathology which propounds that the human body is composed of Tridoshas, the three humors – Vata, Pitta and Kapha. When these are in equilibrium they are called the Tridhatus.

The body in which these three humors are in a state of equilibrium enjoys perfect health; their disequilibrium causes ill health.

Disease management in Ayurveda

The principles of pharmacology are fundamentally different from those of other systems of medicine, especially evidence-based medicine. Most medicines are prepared form herbs.

Shamana and Shodhana are the two concepts of disease management in Ayurveda. Shamana means alleviation. Shamana methods mitigate the disease and its symptoms. Shodhana means elimination and Shodhana methods aim at the elimination of the basic cause of disease.

Note: Guidelines provided here are general. Specific adjustments for individual requirements may need to be made, e.g., food allergies, strength of agni, season of the year and degree of dosha predominance or aggravation.

okay in moderation okay rarely

FRUITS

VATA

o Avoid: Generally most dried fruit, Apples (raw), Cranberries, Dates (dry), Figs (dry), Pears, Persimmons, Pomegranates, Raisins (dry), Prunes (dry), Watermelon

o Favor: Generally most sweet fruit, Apples (cooked), Applesauce, Apricots, Avocado, Bananas, Berries, Cherries, Coconut, Dates (fresh), Figs (fresh), Grapefruit, Grapes, Kiwi, Lemons, Limes, Mangoes , Melons, Oranges, Papaya, Peaches, Pineapple, Plums, Prunes (soaked), Raisins (soaked), Rhubarb, Strawberries, Tamarind

PITTA

o Avoid: Generally most sour fruit, Apples (sour), Apricots (sour), Bananas, Berries (sour), Cherries (sour), Cranberries, Grapefruit, Grapes (green), Kiwi, Lemons, Mangoes (green), Oranges (sour), Peaches, Persimmons, Pineapple (sour), Plums (sour), Rhubarb, Tamarind

o Favor: Generally most sweet fruit, Apples (sweet), Applesauce, Apricots (sweet), Avocado, Berries (Sweet), Cherries (sweet), Coconut, Dates, Figs, Grapes (red & purple), Limes, Mangoes (ripe), Melons, oranges (sweet), Papaya, Pears, Pineapple (sweet), Plums (sweet), Pomegranates, Prunes, Raisins, Strawberries, Watermelon

KAPHA

o Avoid: Generally most sweet & sour fruit, Avocado, Bananas, Coconut, Dates, Figs (fresh), Grapefruit, Kiwi, Mangos, Melons, Oranges, Papaya, Pineapple, Plums, Rhubarb, Tamarind, Watermelon

o Favor : Generally most astringent fruit, Apples, Applesauce, Apricots, Berries, Cherries, Cranberries, Figs (dry), Grapes, Lemons, Limes, Peaches, Pears, Persimmons, Pomegranates, Prunes, Raisins, Strawberries

VEGETABLES

VATA

o Avoid: Generally frozen, raw or dried vegetables, Artichoke, Beet greens, Bitter melon, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Burdock root, Cabbage (raw), Cauliflower (raw), Celery, Corn (fresh), Dandelion greens, Eggplant, Horseradish, Kale, Kohlrabi, Mushrooms, Olives, green Onions (raw), Peas (raw), Peppers, sweet & hot Potatoes, white Prickly pear (fruit & leaves), Radish (raw), Squash, winter Tomatoes (cooked), Tomatoes (raw), Turnips, Wheat grass, sprouts

o Favor: In general, vegetables should be cooked Asparagus, Beets, Cabbage (cooked), Carrots, Cauliflower, Cilantro, Cucumber, Daikon radish, Fennel, (Anise), Garlic, Green beans, Green chilies, Jerusalem artichoke, Leafy greens, Leeks , Lettuce, Mustard greens, Okra, Olives, black Onions (cooked), Parsley, Parsnip, Peas (cooked), Potatoes, sweet, Pumpkin, Radishes (cooked), Rutabaga, Spaghetti Squash, Spinach (raw), Sprouts, Squash Summer, Taro Root, Turnip greens, Watercress, Zucchini

PITTA

o Avoid: In General pungent vegetables, Beet Greens, Beets (raw), Burdock root, Corn (fresh), Daikon Radish, Eggplant, Garlic, Green Chillies, Horseradish, Kohlrabi, Leeks (raw), Mustard greens, Olives green, Onion (raw), Peppers (hot), Turnip Greens, Watercress, Zucchini Prickly pear fruit, Radishes (raw, Spinach (cooked), Spinach (raw), Tomatoes, Turnip greens, Turnips

o Favor: In general, sweet & bitter vegetable, artichoke, Asparagus, Beets (cooked), Bitter Melon, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots (cooked), Carrots (raw), Cauliflower, Celery, Cilantro, Cucumber, Dandelion greens, Fennel (Anise) Green Beans, Jerusalem, Artichoke, Kala, Leafy Greens, Leeks (cooked), Lettuce, Mushrooms, Okra, Olives black, Onions (cooked), Parsley, Parsnips, Peas, Peppers sweet, Potatoes, sweet & white, Prickly pear (leaves), Pumpkin, Radishes (cooked)Rutabaga, Spaghetti Squash, Sprouts (not spicy), Squash, winter & summer, Taro root, Watercress, Wheat grass, sprouts, Zucchini

KAPHA

o Avoid: In general, Sweet & juicy vegetables, Cucumber, Olives, black or green, Parsnips, Potatoes sweet, Pumpkin, Squash summer, Taro root, Tomatoes (raw), Zucchini

o Favor: In general, most pungent & bitter Vegetables, Artichoke, Asparagus, Beet greens, Beets, Bitter melon, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Burdock root, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cilantro, Corn, Daikon radish, Dandelion greens, Eggplant, Fennel (Anise), Garlic, Green beans, Green chilies, Horseradish, Jerusalem, artichoke, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leafy greens, Leeks, Lettuce, Mushrooms, Mustard greens, Okra, Onions, Parseley, Peas, Peppers, sweet & hot, Potatoes, White Prickly pear (fruit & leaves), Radishes, Rutabega, Spaghetti Squash, Spinach, Sprouts, Swaush, winter Tomatoes (cooked) Turnips, Watercress, Wheat grass

GRAINS

VATA

o Avoid: Barley, Bread (with yeast), Buckwheat, Cereals (cold, dry or puffed), Corn, Couscous, Crackers, Granola, Millet, Muesli, Oat bran, Oats (dry), Pasta, Polenta, Rice cakes, Rye, Sago, Spelt, Tapioca, Wheat bran

o Favor: Amaranth, Durham flour, Oats (cooked), Pancakes, Quinoa, Rice (all kinds), Seitan (wheat meat), Sprouted wheat, bread (Essene), Wheat

PITTA

o Avoid: Bread (with yeast), Buckwheat, Corn, Millet, Muesli, Oats (dry), Polenta, Rice (brown), Rye

o Favor: Amaranth, Barley, Cereal, dry, Couscous, Crackers, Durham flour, Granola, Oat bran, Oats (cooked), Pancakes, Pasta, Quinoa, Rice (basmati, white, wild), Rice cakes, Seitan (wheat meat), Spelt, Sprouted wheat, bread (Essene), Tapioca, Wheat, Wheat bran

KAPHA

o Avoid: Bread (with yeast), Oats (cooked), Pancakes, Pasta, Rice (brown, white), Rice cakes, Wheat

o Favor: Amaranth , Barley, Buckwheat, Cereal (cold, dry or puffed), Corn, Couscous, Crackers, Durham flour, Granola, Millet, Muesli, Oat bran, Oats dry), Polenta, Quinoa, Rice (basmati, wild), Rye, Seitan (wheat meat), Spelt, Sprouted , wheat bread (Essene), Tapioca, Wheat bran

LEGUMES

VATA

o Avoid: Aduki beans, Black beans, Black-eyed peas, Chick peas (garbanzo beans), Kidney beans, Lentils (brown), Lima beans , Miso, Navy beans, Peas (dried), Pinto beans, Soy beans, Soy flour, Soy powder, Split peas, Tempeh, White beans

o Favor: Lentils (red), Mung beans, Mung dal, Soy cheese, Soy milk, Soy sauce, Soy sausages, Tofu, Tur dal, Urad dal

PITTA

o Avoid: Miso, Soy sauce, Soy sausages, Tur dal, Urad dal

o Favor: Aduki beans, Black beans, Black-eyed peas, Chick peas (garbanzo beans), Kidney beans, Lentils, brown & red, Lima beans, Mung beans, Mung dal, Navy beans, Peas (dried), Pinto beans, Soy beans, Soy cheese, Soy flour, Soy milk, Soy powder, Split peas, Tempeh, Tofu, White beans

KAPHA

o Avoid: Kidney beans, Soy beans, Soy cheese, Soy flour, Soy powder, Soy sauce, Tofu (cold), Urad dal, Miso

o Favor: Aduki beans, Black beans, Black-eyed peas, Chick peas (garbanzo beans), Lentils (red & brown), Lima beans, Mung beans, Mung dal, Navy beans, Peas (dried), Pinto beans, Soy milk, Soy sausages, Split peas, Tempeh, Tofu (hot), Tur dal, White beans

DAIRY

VATA

o Avoid: Cow’s milk (powdered), Goat’s milk (powdered), Yogurt (plain, frozen or w/ fruit)

o Favor: Most dairy is good!, Butter, Buttermilk, Butter Cheese (hard), Cheese (soft), Cottage cheese, Cow’s milk, Ghee, Goat’s cheese, Goat’s milk, Ice cream, Sour cream, Yogurt (diluted & spiced)

PITTA

o Avoid: Butter (salted), Buttermilk, Cheese (hard), Sour cream, Yogurt (plain, frozen or w/fruit)

o Favor: Butter (unsalted), Cheese (soft, not aged, unsalted), Cottage cheese, Cow’s milk, Ghee, Goat’s milk, Goat’s cheese (soft, unsalted), Ice cream, Yogurt (freshly made & diluted)

KAPHA

o

Avoid: Butter (salted), Butter (unsalted), Cheese (soft & hard), Cow’s milk, Ice cream, Sour cream, Yogurt (plain, frozen or w/fruit)

o Favor: Buttermilk, Cottage cheese (from skimmed goat’s milk), Ghee, Goat’s cheese (unsalted & not aged), Goat’s milk, skim, Yogurt (diluted)

ANIMAL FOODS

VATA

o Avoid: Lamb, Pork, Rabbit, Venison, Turkey (white)

o Favor: Beef, Buffalo, Chicken (dark), Chicken (white), Duck, Eggs, Fish (freshwater or sea), Salmon, Sardines, Seafood, Shrimp, Tuna fish, Turkey (dark)

PITTA

o Avoid: Beef, Chicken (dark), Duck, Eggs (yolk), Fish (sea), Lamb, Pork, Salmon, Sardines, Seafood, Tuna fish, Turkey (dark)

o Favor: Buffalo, Chicken (white), Eggs (albumen or white only), Fish (freshwater), Rabbit, Shrimp, Turkey (white), Venison

KAPHA

o Avoid: Beef, Buffalo, Chicken (dark), Duck, Fish (sea), Lamb, Pork, Salmon, Sardines, Seafood, Tuna fish, Turkey (dark)

o Favor: Chicken (white), Eggs, Fish (freshwater), Rabbit, Shrimp, Turkey (white), Venison

CONDIMENTS

VATA

o Avoid: Chocolate, Horseradish

o Favor: Black pepper, Chutney, mango (sweet or spicy), Chili peppers, Coriander leaves, Dulse, Gomasio, Hijiki, Kelp, Ketchup, Kombu, Lemon, Lime, Lime pickle, Mango pickle, Mayonnaise, Mustard, Pickles, Salt, Scallions, Seaweed, Soy sauce, Sprouts, Tamari, Vinegar

PITTA

o Avoid: Chili pepper, Chocolate, Chutney, mango (spicy), Gomasio, Horseradish, Kelp, Ketchup, Mustard, Lemon, Lime pickle, Mango pickle, Mayonnaise, Pickles, Salt (in excess), Scallions, Soy sauce, Vinegar

o Favor: Black pepper, Chutney, mango, (sweet), Coriander leaves, Dulse, Hijiki, Kombu , Lime, Sprouts, Salt, Seaweed, Tamari

KAPHA

o Avoid: Chocolate, Chutney, mango (sweet), Gomasio, Kelp, Ketchup, Lime, Lime pickle, Mango pickle, Mayonnaise, Pickles, Salt, Soy sauce, Tamari, Vinegar

o Favor: Black pepper, Chili Peppers, Chutney, mango (spicy), Coriander leaves, Dulse, Hijiki, Horseradish, Lemon, Mustard (without vinegar), Scallions, Seaweed, Sprouts

NUTS

VATA

o Avoid: None

o Favor: In moderation: Almonds, Black walnuts, Brazil nuts, Cashews, Charole, Coconut, Filberts, Hazelnuts, Macadamia nuts, Peanuts, Pecans, Pine nuts, Pistachios, Walnuts

PITTA

o Avoid: Black walnuts, Brazil nuts, Cashews, Filberts, Hazelnuts, Macadamia nuts, Peanuts, Pecans, Pine nuts, Pistachios, Walnuts

o Favor: Charole, Coconut

KAPHA

o Avoid: Black walnuts, Brazil nuts, Cashews, Coconut, Filberts, Hazelnuts, Macadamia nuts, Peanuts, Pecans, Pine nuts, Pistachios, Walnuts

o Favor: None

SEEDS

VATA

o Avoid: Popcorn, Psyllium

o Favor: Chia, Flax, Halva, Pumpkin, Sesame, Sunflower, Tahini

PITTA

o Avoid: Chia, Sesame, Tahini

o Favor: Flax, Halva, Popcorn (no salt, buttered), Psyllium, Pumpkin, Sunflower

KAPHA

o Avoid: Halva, Psyllium, Sesame, Tahini

o Favour : Chia, Flax, Popcorn (no salt, no butter), Pumpkin, Sunflower

OILS

VATA

o Avoid: Flax seed

o Favor: For internal & external use: (most suitable at top of list), Sesame, Ghee, Olive, Most other oils

o External use only: Coconut, Avocado

PITTA

o Avoid: Almond, Apricot, Corn , Safflower, Sesame

o Favor: For internal & external use: (most suitable at top of list), Sunflower, Ghee, Canola, Olive, Soy, Flax seed, Primrose, Walnut

o External use only: Avocado, Coconut

KAPHA

o Avoid: Avocado, Apricot, Coconut, Flax seed, Olive, Primrose, Safflower, Sesame (internal), Soy, Walnut

o Favor: For internal & external use in small amounts: (Most suitable at top of list), Corn, Canola, Sesame (external), Sunflower, Ghee, Almond

BEVERAGES

VATA

o Avoid: Alcohol (hard; red wine), Apple juice , Black tea, Caffeinated, beverages, Carbonated drinks, Chocolate milk, Coffee, Cold dairy drinks , Cranberry juice, Iced tea, Icy cold drinks, Pear juice, Pomegranate juice, Prune juice, Soy milk (cold), Tomato juice, V-8 Juice, Herb Teas: Alfalfa, Barley, Basil, Blackberry, Borage, Burdock, Cinnamon, Cornsilk, Dandelion, Ginseng, Hibiscus, Hops, Jasmine, Lemon balm, Mormon tea, Nettle, Passion flower, Red clover, Red Zinger, Violet, Yarrow, Yerba Mate

o Favor: Alcohol (beer; white wine), Almond milk, Aloe vera juice, Apple cider, Apricot juice, Berry juice (except for cranberry), Carob, Carrot juice, Chai (hot spiced milk), Cherry juice, Grain “coffee”, Grape juice, Grapefruit juice, Lemonade, Mango juice, Miso broth, Orange juice, Papaya juice, Peach nectar, Pineapple juice, Rice milk, Sour juices, Soy milk (hot & well-spiced), Vegetable bouillon

o Herb Teas: Ajwan, Bancha, Catnip, Chamomile, Chicory, Chrysanthemum, Clove, Comfrey, Elder Flower, Eucalyptus, Fennel, Fenugreek, Ginger (fresh), Hawthorne, Juniper berry, Kukicha, Lavender, Lemon grass, Licorice, Marshmallow, Oat straw, Orange peel, Pennyroyal, Peppermint, Raspberry, Rosehips, Saffron, Sage, Sarsaparilla, Sassafras, Spearmint, Strawberry, Wintergreen

PITTA

o Avoid: Alcohol (hard; red & sweet wine) , Apple cider, Berry juice (sour), Caffeinated, beverages, Carbonated drinks, Carrot juice, Cherry juice (sour), Chocolate milk, Coffee, Cranberry juice, Grapefruit juice, Iced tea, Icy cold drinks, Lemonade, Papaya juice , Pineapple juice, Tomato juice, V-8 juice, Sour juices

o Herb Teas: Ajwan, Basil, Clove, Eucalyptus, Fenugreek, Ginger (dry), Ginseng, Hawthorne, Juniper berry, Mormon tea, Pennyroyal, Red Zinger , Rosehip, Sage, Sassafras, Yerba Mat

o Favor: Alcohol (beer; dry white wine), Almond milk , Aloe vera juice, Apple juice, Apricot juice, Berry juice (sweet), Black tea , Carob, Chai (hot, spiced milk) , Cherry juice (sweet), Cool dairy drinks, Grain “coffee”, Grape juice, Mango juice, Miso broth, Mixed veg. juice, Orange juice, Peach nectar, Pear juice, Pomegranate juice, Prune juice, Rice milk, Soy milk, Vegetable bouillon

o Herb Teas: Alfalfa, Bancha, Barley, Blackberry, Borage, Burdock, Catnip, Chamomile, Chicory, Comfrey, Dandelion, Fennel, Ginger (fresh), Hibiscus, Hops , Jasmine, Kukicha, Lavender, Lemon balm, Lemon grass, Licorice, Marshmallow, Nettle, Oat Straw, Passion flower, Peppermint, Raspberry, Red clover, Sarsaparilla, Spearmint, Strawberry, Violet, Wintergreen, Yarrow

KAPHA

o Avoid: Alcohol (hard; beer; sweet wine), Almond milk, Caffeinated , beverages, Carbonated drinks, Cherry juice (sour), Chocolate milk, Coffee, Cold dairy drinks, Grapefruit juice, Iced tea, Icy cold drinks, Lemonade, Miso broth, Orange Juice, Papaya juice, Rice milk ,Sour juices, Soy milk (cold), Tomato juice, V-8 Juice

o Herb Teas: Licorice, Marshmallow, Red Zinger, Rosehip, Bancha

o Favor: Alcohol (dry wine, red or white), loe vera juice, Apple cider, Apple juice, Apricot juice, Berry juice, Black tea (spiced), Carob, Carrot juice, Chai (hot, spiced milk), Cherry juice (sweet), Cranberry juice , Grain “coffee”, Grape juice, Mango juice, Peach nectar, Pear juice, Pineapple juice, Pomegranate juice, Prune juice, Soy milk (hot & well-spiced),

o Herb Teas: Alfalfa, Bancha, Barley, Blackberry, Burdock, Chamomile, Chicory, Cinnamon, Clove, Comfrey, Dandelion , Fennel, Fenugreek, Ginger , Ginseng, Hibiscus Jasmine, Juniper berry, Kukicha, Lavender, Lemon balm, Lemon grass, Mormon tea, Nettle, Passion flower, Peppermint, Raspberry, Red clover , Sarsaparilla, Sassafras, Spearmint , Strawberry, Wintergreen, Yarrow, Yerba Mate

SPICES

VATA

o Avoid: None

o Favor: All spices are good Ajwan, Allspice, Almond extract, Anise, Asafoetida (hing), Basil, Bay leaf, Black pepper, Caraway, Cardamom, Cayenne, Cinnamon, Cloves, Coriander, Cumin, Dill, Fennel, Fenugreek, Garlic, Ginger, Marjoram, Mint, Mustard seeds, Nutmeg, Orange peel, Oregano, Paprika, Parsley, Peppermint, Pippali, Poppy seeds, Rosemary, Saffron, Salt, Savory, Spearmint, Star Anise, Tarragon, Thyme, Turmeric, Vanilla, Wintergreen

PITTA

o Avoid: Ajwan, Allspice, Almond extract, Anise, Asafoetida (hing), Basil (dry), Bay leaf, Cayenne, Cloves, Fenugreek, Garlic, Ginger (dry), Mace, Marjoram, Mustard seeds, Nutmeg, Oregano, Paprika, Pippali, Poppy seeds, Rosemary, Sage, Salt, Savory, Star anise, Thyme

o Favor: Basil (fresh), Black pepper, Caraway, Cardamom, Cinnamon, Coriander, Cumin, Dill, Fennel, Ginger (fresh), Mint, Neem leaves, Orange peel, Parsley, Peppermint, Saffron, Spearmint, Tarragon, Turmeric, Vanilla, Wintergreen

KAPHA

o Avoid: Salt

o Favor: All spices are good Ajwan, Allspice, Almond extract, Anise, Asafoetida (hing), Basil, Bay leaf, Black pepper, Caraway, Cardamom, Cayenne, Cinnamon, Cloves, Coriander, Cumin, Dill, Fennel*, Fenugreek, Garlic, Ginger, Marjoram, Mint, Mustard seeds, Neem leaves, Nutmeg, Orange peel, Oregano, Paprika, Parsley, Peppermint, Pippali, Poppy seeds, Rosemary, Saffron, Savory, Spearmint, Star Anise, Tarragon, Thyme, Turmeric, Vanilla, Wintergreen

SWEETENERS

VATA

o Avoid: Maple syrup, White Sugar

o Favor: Barley malt, Fructose, Fruit juice, concentrates, Honey, Jaggary, Molasses, Rice syrup, Dried or fresh sugar cane juice, Turbinado

PITTA

o Avoid: White Sugar, Honey, Jaggary, Molasses

o Favor: Barley malt, Fructose, Fruit juice, concentrates, Maple syrup, Rice syrup, Dried or fresh sugar cane juice, Turbinado

KAPHA

o Avoid: Barley malt, Fructose, Jaggary, Maple syrup, Molasses, Rice syrup, Dried or fresh sugar cane juice, Turbinado, White sugar

o Favor: Fruit juice, concentrates, Honey (raw & not processed)

FOOD SUPPLEMENTS

VATA

o Avoid: Barley green, Brewer’s yeast, Vitamin: K

o Favor: Aloe Vera juice, Bee pollen, Amino acids

o Minerals: Calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, zinc, Royal jelly, Spirolina, Blue-green algae

o Vitamins: A, B1, B2,B6, B12, C, D, E, P and Folic acid

PITTA

o Avoid: Amino acid, Bee pollen, Royal jelly

o Minerals: copper, iron

o Vitamins: B2,B6,C,E, and Folic acid

o Favor: Aloe vera juice, Barley green, Brewer’s yeast

o Minerals: Calcium, Magnesium, zinc, Spirolina, Blue-green algae

o Vitamins: A, B1, B12, D and K

KAPHA

o Avoid:

o Minerals: Potassium

o Vitamins: A, B1, B2, B12, C, D, and E

o Favor: Aloe vera juice, Amino acid, Barley green, Bee pollen, Brewer’s yeast

o Minerals: copper, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, Royal jelly, Spirolina, Blue-green algae

o Vitamins: B6, C, P and Folic Acid